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How will new Treaty affect Cyprus veto on Turkey's EU bid ?

Benefits and problems from the EU membership.

Postby phoenix » Thu Dec 13, 2007 1:02 pm

Why?

What is the worst that could happen, if Turkey is kept out of the EU?

Will they blow up Cyprus? . . . destroy it completely?
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Postby Get Real! » Thu Dec 13, 2007 1:07 pm

Bananiot wrote:The worst thing that can happen to Cyprus is for Turkey to stay outside the EU. The people that cannot comprehend this simple truth are the biggest enemies of Cyprus, to use the same terminology of the cretins.

Stop assuming that you comprehend above and beyond all else because GR has already taken that spot and says you don't. 8)
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Postby Jerry » Thu Dec 13, 2007 4:00 pm

Bananiot wrote:The worst thing that can happen to Cyprus is for Turkey to stay outside the EU. The people that cannot comprehend this simple truth are the biggest enemies of Cyprus, to use the same terminology of the cretins.


I have to agree with Bananiot here. When and if Turkey discovers it can't join the EU any leverage Cyprus has on Turkey agreeing to a solution will disappear and the current stalemate will continue.
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Postby humanist » Fri Dec 14, 2007 2:51 am

The worst thing that can happen to Cyprus is for Turkey to stay outside the EU. The people that cannot comprehend this simple truth are the biggest enemies of Cyprus, to use the same terminology of the cretins.


And Turkey shall gain entry into EU when it stops violating human rights and occupies Cyprus or any other nation for that matter. I am in total and absolute support of that, however no nation violating human rihgts and through military force violating the sovereighnty of another shall be rewarded.

However, we al know that Turkish speaking Cypriots want Turkey to stay and therefore not nly preventing Turkey to membership within EU but also hindering their opportunities to their own accession through a unified Cyprus.
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Postby Get Real! » Fri Dec 14, 2007 2:55 am

Jerry wrote:
Bananiot wrote:The worst thing that can happen to Cyprus is for Turkey to stay outside the EU. The people that cannot comprehend this simple truth are the biggest enemies of Cyprus, to use the same terminology of the cretins.


I have to agree with Bananiot here. When and if Turkey discovers it can't join the EU any leverage Cyprus has on Turkey agreeing to a solution will disappear and the current stalemate will continue.

There never was any leverage in the first place so nothing is lost.
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Postby Jerry » Sun Dec 16, 2007 8:41 pm

It's not actually clear to me if the veto will be lost, according to today's Cyprus Mail it can only be applied in particular areas. However if the author's reference to permanent derogations is correct it means that the ROC is always going to oppose Turkey's membership, as may other member States. We have seen how immigration has helped to "Turkify" the north. Free movement of EU citizens would inevitably result in a peaceful legal invasion of the whole of Cyprus by mainland Turks who, within a few generations, would constitute the majority. Following the logic of this scenario, it would be suicide for the ROC to "permit" Turkey's membership. With this in mind Turkey has little incentive to solve the Cyprus problem and the current impasse will go on indefinitely.


By Stefanos Evripidou
National vetoes will be removed from certain areas of decision-making while the Commission will have 49 new areas of competences. The European Parliament will have a greater say in more areas while national parliaments will also have a chance to get more involved. The European Court of Justice will have more powers to rule in justice and home affairs, which in the past was the sole domain of member states.

Do you see a pattern? Member states losing vetoes means a majority rules system which favours alliances and common interests over individual vetoes and narrow mindsets. Granting the Commission more competences in 49 areas means taking away from national governments the sole right to rule in 49 areas. This treaty, like the ones before it, makes a strong statement of intent – an increasingly federal approach towards integration. This is not altogether a bad thing, but it is something people should be aware of rather than thinking that Brussels is just some city that our ministers frequent when they want to get away from the office.

The Cyprus problem
And finally, how do the technocrats in Brussels see a final settlement? There are two non-negotiable stipulations. First, the final outcome must give Cyprus one voice in the EU, one body that can enforce the acquis. Second, there can be no permanent derogations. For the rest, the EU will take a flexible approach, particularly where public interest dictates so. It is worth remembering that the EU declared the berated Annan plan fully compliant with EU laws back in 2004. As far as the EU is concerned, EU principles will not be a constraint to a solution.

Another issue worth highlighting is that the EU does not foresee any role as arbiter. Given the Republic's EU membership, the EU cannot play the role of honest broker while the Greek Cypriots effectively have a veto in Council. The most the EU can do is have its lawyers work alongside the UN to deal with the acquis if and when negotiations start.

Rumour has it that when UN officials went to Brussels recently to discuss the Cyprus problem the concept of the Cypriot veto in the EU had to be explained to them. According to one source, they were shocked to discover exactly how much the tail was wagging the dog.

Given the above, the general view in Brussels is that trade and aid in their current forms will not achieve very much. The great hope is for the start of talks towards a comprehensive solution in 2008. In the words of one candid official: “We will see what happens in the February elections; it will be a good indicator of peoples' will.”
Copyright © Cyprus Mail 2007
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Postby DINOS SKALIOTIS » Wed Dec 19, 2007 2:50 am

Get Real! wrote:
Jerry wrote:
Bananiot wrote:The worst thing that can happen to Cyprus is for Turkey to stay outside the EU. The people that cannot comprehend this simple truth are the biggest enemies of Cyprus, to use the same terminology of the cretins.


I have to agree with Bananiot here. When and if Turkey discovers it can't join the EU any leverage Cyprus has on Turkey agreeing to a solution will disappear and the current stalemate will continue.

There never was any leverage in the first place so nothing is lost.


is the correct answer! there never was any leverage! turkey has made it clear that they aint giving nothing back! we havnt got the bottle to do anything about it so thats it game over, goodnight :evil:
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Postby BC Numismatics » Wed Dec 19, 2007 3:00 am

Bananiot wrote:The worst thing that can happen to Cyprus is for Turkey to stay outside the EU. The people that cannot comprehend this simple truth are the biggest enemies of Cyprus, to use the same terminology of the cretins.


Bananiot,Turkey IS NOT a European country at all.It is a country in the Middle East,which is why it doesn't qualify to join the European Union.

To be frank,the E.U. should admit Albania,Bosnia-Hercegovina,& Kosovo,as they are states with a Muslim-majority population,& they ARE located in Europe!

Aidan.
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