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Is this rubbish or what?

How can we solve it? (keep it civilized)

religious freedom

Postby tcypriot » Fri May 07, 2004 12:54 am

Sorry to say but our compatriots greekcypriots yet have much to do to become a secular community.That animal bishop should be immediately fired or put in jail if greekcyps are serious about a solution.

As long as people like her are a minority there's no possibility of a solution.


Thanks to the turkishcypriots that there's a secular state in Cyprus, namely TRNC.
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Postby Piratis » Fri May 07, 2004 12:57 am

any more jokes?
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listen this one than

Postby tcypriot » Fri May 07, 2004 1:23 am

I know that religion man giving political suggestions to citizens is really funny piratis but it's not all over.Here comes more:

There are even some people, who believe in the words of the so called 'religion man' that says people who say no will go to heaven, and vote no.

No you didnt read wrongly.Yes! there are people who say 'no' to peace to go to heaven.This joke is better you see.First joke was about a religion man speaking about matters that are far out of his vison and abilites.And the funnier part of the joke is that, neither that 'bishop' who connects going to heaven with saying no to peace nor people who make their decision upon believing in him are hospitalised.What a joke hah?
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Postby Piratis » Fri May 07, 2004 1:34 am

The joke is the "state" part in the same sentence with the "TRNC".

In democracy everybody is allowed to say whatever he/she feels like.

We don't put people in jail because of what they believe or say. Here is not Turkey, here is Europe.
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Postby metecyp » Fri May 07, 2004 1:51 am

We don't put people in jail because of what they believe or say. Here is not Turkey, here is Europe.

Yeah, they don't go to jail, they just get bombed, that's all. Opps, I'm sorry, they bomb themselves, I forgot.
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Postby Piratis » Fri May 07, 2004 1:57 am

Sorry that we have some crime. We are not a paradise here like in Turkey :roll:

If I was a Turk i would feel ashamed to talk about others for these kind of things. Why don't you look what happens in your side, were the state itself is terrorizing and murdering innocent people?
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Postby Piratis » Fri May 07, 2004 1:59 am

In the self-styled Turkish Republic of North Cyprus, recognised only by Ankara, RSF noted that press freedom had "sharply declined" during 2003.

"The authorities cracked down on journalists who criticised the government of president Rauf Denktash. Five journalists were facing between 10 and 40 years in prison for 'insulting the army',"


Turkey, another long-time EU candidate, also came in for criticism, with armed forces chief of staff Hilmi Ozkok named by RSF as a "predator of press freedom."

"Working conditions remained very difficult for journalists in Turkey despite some legislative improvements to boost the country's chances of EU membership," the Paris-based press freedom advocate said.

"Pro-Kurdish journalists and those who criticised the government or the role of the armed forces in political life continued to be extensively harassed," it said, adding that four journalists were currently in prison.

Army chief Ozkok was dubbed as a predator in his capacity as a member of the National Security Council, a body that gives the military a permanent say in Turkey's political affairs and its news media.

Long rebuked by the EU for its shaky democracy, Turkey was only formally declared a candidate in 1999, decades after it first signed an association agreement with the European Community in the 1960s.


http://www.eubusiness.com/afp/040502220421.fpeky7rv
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Postby metecyp » Fri May 07, 2004 2:12 am

If I was a Turk i would feel ashamed to talk about others for these kind of things. Why don't you look what happens in your side, were the state itself is terrorizing and murdering innocent people?

I told you this before. I am a Turkish Cypriot. I was born in Cyprus, I was raised in Cyprus, and I'm as Cypriot as you are. If you're so incapable and ignorant to distinguish between me and an ordinary Turkish citizen in Turkey, then I don't have anything else to tell you.

I don't always agree with Turkey's policies on Cyprus issue, on Kurdish issue etc. But I don't need to apologize for these because I'm not a citizen of Turkey. According to your logic, German-Americans should feel guilty about WW2, Italian-Americans should feel guilty about Mossoluni, British-Americans should feel guilty about what they did to Scottish (watched Braveheart?) etc.

Besides I always criticize Turkey if I see something not right in Turkey. I got into countless debates with Turks about Turkey's policy on Cyprus. Similarly, I can criticize your side if I see something wrong. Since everything is not perfect in Turkey does not mean that I cannot criticize. Besides as I said, whatever happens in Turkey is Turkey's and Turkish citizens' business, not mine.
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Postby Piratis » Fri May 07, 2004 4:56 pm

You can criticize as much as you want. We all do.
But trying to prove that democracy is not good in Cyprus because of some rare incidents is a lame attempt.

Just yesterday 3 bombs went off damaging the Kibris newspaper offices in the north.

Here is also the 2004 report from Reporters without borders about occupied Cyprus:
http://www.rsf.org/article.php3?id_article=10137

There is no perfect country or perfect democracy. Still Cyprus would rank very high if you compare all other democratic countries.
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Postby metecyp » Fri May 07, 2004 6:50 pm

But trying to prove that democracy is not good in Cyprus because of some rare incidents is a lame attempt.

Where did you get that impression? I didn't try to prove that democracy is not good in Cyprus. I just wanted to tell you that democracy means while majority rules, minority is being listened, minority's wishes and desires are taken into account. The recent incidents showed that democracy is ONLY "majority rules" for GCs and the rest of the defintion of democracy doesn't apply. Any different opinion is not tolerated. I didn't say democracy is not good for Cyprus. I just said democracy applied in its pure form is not good simply because of the mentality of GCs that majority rules and nothing else is important.
Just yesterday 3 bombs went off damaging the Kibris newspaper offices in the north.

Yes, there are people in the north as well that cannot tolerate the opposite opinions. It's that kind of people that we need to fight against, if you are really seeking real democracy.
There is no perfect country or perfect democracy. Still Cyprus would rank very high if you compare all other democratic countries.

Ok, I agree, but this is simply because GCs are not ever challenged. Nobody challenged the "democracy" in the south, for example, to listen TC wishes and desires. When, there's no minority participation, of course, there's never going to be a problem, and everything will seem to be perfect. Who are you trying to deceive here? Go and tell these to Europeans who know nothing about Cyprus, not to me.
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