The Best Cyprus Community

Skip to content


Cypriots are stupid!!!!

How can we solve it? (keep it civilized)

Postby Viewpoint » Sat Jun 12, 2010 3:44 pm

Proves my point same old shit goes round and round, Cypriots all over this island are stupid, couldnt organize a piss up in brewery.
User avatar
Viewpoint
Leading Contributor
Leading Contributor
 
Posts: 25211
Joined: Sun Feb 20, 2005 2:48 pm
Location: Nicosia/Lefkosa

Postby BirKibrisli » Sat Jun 12, 2010 3:57 pm

Viewpoint wrote:Proves my point same old shit goes round and round, Cypriots all over this island are stupid, couldnt organize a piss up in brewery.


I beg to differ,Viewpoint...Cypriots can organise a piss up in a brewery...DT and GR do it regularly in Nicosia,and they are doing it in London as we speak....On any other issue Cypriots singly can do nothing but together they can decide that nothing can be done....Now that is something... :lol: :lol:
User avatar
BirKibrisli
Main Contributor
Main Contributor
 
Posts: 6162
Joined: Tue Aug 16, 2005 4:28 pm
Location: Australia

Postby bill cobbett » Sat Jun 12, 2010 4:19 pm

For the sake of progress, a CF first, please allow me to suggest a couple of areas where we might all agree ....

By around this time next year, they'll be a settlement.

It'll be a settlement none of us will be happy with.

It'll be an end to CyProb for a century or two (or thereabouts)
User avatar
bill cobbett
Leading Contributor
Leading Contributor
 
Posts: 15760
Joined: Sun Dec 17, 2006 5:20 pm
Location: Embargoed from Kyrenia by Jurkish Army and Genocided (many times) by Thieving, Brain-Washed Lordo

Postby DT. » Sat Jun 12, 2010 4:58 pm

BirKibrisli wrote:
Viewpoint wrote:Proves my point same old shit goes round and round, Cypriots all over this island are stupid, couldnt organize a piss up in brewery.


I beg to differ,Viewpoint...Cypriots can organise a piss up in a brewery...DT and GR do it regularly in Nicosia,and they are doing it in London as we speak....On any other issue Cypriots singly can do nothing but together they can decide that nothing can be done....Now that is something... :lol: :lol:


Perhaps the problem lies with the tc's. I have come to agreement with mainland Turks many times on what would be acceptble to me as a GC and them to end the millitary occupation.
User avatar
DT.
Leading Contributor
Leading Contributor
 
Posts: 12196
Joined: Sun Nov 12, 2006 8:34 pm
Location: Lefkosia

Postby Gasman » Sat Jun 12, 2010 6:58 pm

http://www.sant.ox.ac.uk/esc/esc-lectures/ker-lindsay.pdf

European Studies Centre
From U Thant to Kofi Annan: UN Peacemaking in Cyprus, 1964-2004
James Ker-Lindsay - October 2005


Theories abound as to why the Cyprus problem has proven to be quite so
difficult to solve. Some have concluded that the Cypriots appear not to want a settlement at all. This view is by no means implausible. In private many Cypriots, on both sides of the Green Line that divides the island, openly acknowledge that division is a better option than partnership. Others have taken a more optimistic view. The failure to reach a deal is not based on any deep-rooted inability of the two sides to live together. Instead, it is based on a fundamental lack of goodwill between the two communities. It is this lack of trust that needs to be addressed before any substantive effort can be successful. Some are just sceptical that there is any solution that would
satisfy the two sides. Perhaps the real problem, or so many feel, is that the parties actually enjoy arguing for argument’s sake, especially given the amount of international attention it brings the island.
There are few other countries of such a small size that have been the focus of so much attention for so long. As one wit once put it, ‘When Cyprus found it could not be a world power, it decided to become a world nuisance’. It certainly sounds plausible to those who know the island well. The two sides certainly have an uncanny knack of finding even the smallest issues to debate and quibble over. As one foreign official neatly explained of Cyprus, ‘It's not so much the complexity, but the infinity of it all. Indeed, many feel that Cyprus richly deserves its epithet: ‘the diplomats’ graveyard’.
Gasman
Main Contributor
Main Contributor
 
Posts: 3561
Joined: Sat May 02, 2009 6:18 pm

Postby Malapapa » Sat Jun 12, 2010 7:19 pm

"When Cyprus found it could not be a world power, it decided to become a world nuisance"


:lol: I like this, and frankly, after a few millennia of serial invasion/occupation/control of Cyprus by one regional/world power after the next, the world deserves it.
Last edited by Malapapa on Sat Jun 12, 2010 7:22 pm, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar
Malapapa
Main Contributor
Main Contributor
 
Posts: 3416
Joined: Sun Oct 25, 2009 9:13 pm

Postby denizaksulu » Sat Jun 12, 2010 7:19 pm

Gasman wrote:http://www.sant.ox.ac.uk/esc/esc-lectures/ker-lindsay.pdf

European Studies Centre
From U Thant to Kofi Annan: UN Peacemaking in Cyprus, 1964-2004
James Ker-Lindsay - October 2005


Theories abound as to why the Cyprus problem has proven to be quite so
difficult to solve. Some have concluded that the Cypriots appear not to want a settlement at all. This view is by no means implausible. In private many Cypriots, on both sides of the Green Line that divides the island, openly acknowledge that division is a better option than partnership. Others have taken a more optimistic view. The failure to reach a deal is not based on any deep-rooted inability of the two sides to live together. Instead, it is based on a fundamental lack of goodwill between the two communities. It is this lack of trust that needs to be addressed before any substantive effort can be successful. Some are just sceptical that there is any solution that would
satisfy the two sides. Perhaps the real problem, or so many feel, is that the parties actually enjoy arguing for argument’s sake, especially given the amount of international attention it brings the island.
There are few other countries of such a small size that have been the focus of so much attention for so long. As one wit once put it, ‘When Cyprus found it could not be a world power, it decided to become a world nuisance’. It certainly sounds plausible to those who know the island well. The two sides certainly have an uncanny knack of finding even the smallest issues to debate and quibble over. As one foreign official neatly explained of Cyprus, ‘It's not so much the complexity, but the infinity of it all. Indeed, many feel that Cyprus richly deserves its epithet: ‘the diplomats’ graveyard’.



Great research Gasman. You are a font of information. :lol: :lol:

I was going to say we are all 'assinine' but you have saVED ME THE TROUBLE NOW. We are all 'evil primadona's'. :lol: :lol:
User avatar
denizaksulu
Forum Addict
Forum Addict
 
Posts: 36050
Joined: Thu May 10, 2007 11:04 am

Postby YFred » Sat Jun 12, 2010 10:11 pm

denizaksulu wrote:
Gasman wrote:http://www.sant.ox.ac.uk/esc/esc-lectures/ker-lindsay.pdf

European Studies Centre
From U Thant to Kofi Annan: UN Peacemaking in Cyprus, 1964-2004
James Ker-Lindsay - October 2005


Theories abound as to why the Cyprus problem has proven to be quite so
difficult to solve. Some have concluded that the Cypriots appear not to want a settlement at all. This view is by no means implausible. In private many Cypriots, on both sides of the Green Line that divides the island, openly acknowledge that division is a better option than partnership. Others have taken a more optimistic view. The failure to reach a deal is not based on any deep-rooted inability of the two sides to live together. Instead, it is based on a fundamental lack of goodwill between the two communities. It is this lack of trust that needs to be addressed before any substantive effort can be successful. Some are just sceptical that there is any solution that would
satisfy the two sides. Perhaps the real problem, or so many feel, is that the parties actually enjoy arguing for argument’s sake, especially given the amount of international attention it brings the island.
There are few other countries of such a small size that have been the focus of so much attention for so long. As one wit once put it, ‘When Cyprus found it could not be a world power, it decided to become a world nuisance’. It certainly sounds plausible to those who know the island well. The two sides certainly have an uncanny knack of finding even the smallest issues to debate and quibble over. As one foreign official neatly explained of Cyprus, ‘It's not so much the complexity, but the infinity of it all. Indeed, many feel that Cyprus richly deserves its epithet: ‘the diplomats’ graveyard’.



Great research Gasman. You are a font of information. :lol: :lol:

I was going to say we are all 'assinine' but you have saVED ME THE TROUBLE NOW. We are all 'evil primadona's'. :lol: :lol:

Hang on a minute, which font type and size did Gasman use. Was that the Official roc font?
User avatar
YFred
Leading Contributor
Leading Contributor
 
Posts: 12100
Joined: Mon Jan 05, 2009 1:22 am
Location: Lurucina-Upon-Thames

Postby denizaksulu » Sat Jun 12, 2010 10:16 pm

YFred wrote:
denizaksulu wrote:
Gasman wrote:http://www.sant.ox.ac.uk/esc/esc-lectures/ker-lindsay.pdf

European Studies Centre
From U Thant to Kofi Annan: UN Peacemaking in Cyprus, 1964-2004
James Ker-Lindsay - October 2005


Theories abound as to why the Cyprus problem has proven to be quite so
difficult to solve. Some have concluded that the Cypriots appear not to want a settlement at all. This view is by no means implausible. In private many Cypriots, on both sides of the Green Line that divides the island, openly acknowledge that division is a better option than partnership. Others have taken a more optimistic view. The failure to reach a deal is not based on any deep-rooted inability of the two sides to live together. Instead, it is based on a fundamental lack of goodwill between the two communities. It is this lack of trust that needs to be addressed before any substantive effort can be successful. Some are just sceptical that there is any solution that would
satisfy the two sides. Perhaps the real problem, or so many feel, is that the parties actually enjoy arguing for argument’s sake, especially given the amount of international attention it brings the island.
There are few other countries of such a small size that have been the focus of so much attention for so long. As one wit once put it, ‘When Cyprus found it could not be a world power, it decided to become a world nuisance’. It certainly sounds plausible to those who know the island well. The two sides certainly have an uncanny knack of finding even the smallest issues to debate and quibble over. As one foreign official neatly explained of Cyprus, ‘It's not so much the complexity, but the infinity of it all. Indeed, many feel that Cyprus richly deserves its epithet: ‘the diplomats’ graveyard’.



Great research Gasman. You are a font of information. :lol: :lol:

I was going to say we are all 'assinine' but you have saVED ME THE TROUBLE NOW. We are all 'evil primadona's'. :lol: :lol:

Hang on a minute, which font type and size did Gasman use. Was that the Official roc font?


Look here Yfred. I am trying to entice Gasman back. After Oracle told her to f*** **f gasman has vanished. :evil:
User avatar
denizaksulu
Forum Addict
Forum Addict
 
Posts: 36050
Joined: Thu May 10, 2007 11:04 am

Postby YFred » Sat Jun 12, 2010 10:21 pm

denizaksulu wrote:
YFred wrote:
denizaksulu wrote:
Gasman wrote:http://www.sant.ox.ac.uk/esc/esc-lectures/ker-lindsay.pdf

European Studies Centre
From U Thant to Kofi Annan: UN Peacemaking in Cyprus, 1964-2004
James Ker-Lindsay - October 2005


Theories abound as to why the Cyprus problem has proven to be quite so
difficult to solve. Some have concluded that the Cypriots appear not to want a settlement at all. This view is by no means implausible. In private many Cypriots, on both sides of the Green Line that divides the island, openly acknowledge that division is a better option than partnership. Others have taken a more optimistic view. The failure to reach a deal is not based on any deep-rooted inability of the two sides to live together. Instead, it is based on a fundamental lack of goodwill between the two communities. It is this lack of trust that needs to be addressed before any substantive effort can be successful. Some are just sceptical that there is any solution that would
satisfy the two sides. Perhaps the real problem, or so many feel, is that the parties actually enjoy arguing for argument’s sake, especially given the amount of international attention it brings the island.
There are few other countries of such a small size that have been the focus of so much attention for so long. As one wit once put it, ‘When Cyprus found it could not be a world power, it decided to become a world nuisance’. It certainly sounds plausible to those who know the island well. The two sides certainly have an uncanny knack of finding even the smallest issues to debate and quibble over. As one foreign official neatly explained of Cyprus, ‘It's not so much the complexity, but the infinity of it all. Indeed, many feel that Cyprus richly deserves its epithet: ‘the diplomats’ graveyard’.



Great research Gasman. You are a font of information. :lol: :lol:

I was going to say we are all 'assinine' but you have saVED ME THE TROUBLE NOW. We are all 'evil primadona's'. :lol: :lol:

Hang on a minute, which font type and size did Gasman use. Was that the Official roc font?


Look here Yfred. I am trying to entice Gasman back. After Oracle told her to f*** **f gasman has vanished. :evil:

She'll be back. Once you are hooked on this forum, you can never leave.
User avatar
YFred
Leading Contributor
Leading Contributor
 
Posts: 12100
Joined: Mon Jan 05, 2009 1:22 am
Location: Lurucina-Upon-Thames

PreviousNext

Return to Cyprus Problem

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest