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Greek Tragedy

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Re: Greek Tragedy

Postby kurupetos » Tue Feb 21, 2017 5:13 pm

yialousa1971 wrote:
kurupetos wrote:When the Greeks discovered Britain the local savages had many tattoos covering their bodies. Pytheas named them Britons because of this.


So this proves StupidUnderDog is an ancient Briton. :)

He's ancient because he's old... :lol:
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Re: Greek Tragedy

Postby supporttheunderdog » Tue Feb 21, 2017 7:41 pm

kurupetos wrote:
supporttheunderdog wrote:
kurupetos wrote:When the Greeks discovered Britain tvhe local savages had many tattoos covering their bodies. Pytheas named them Britons because of this.


Greeks discover Britain....? :lol: :lol: :lol:

Pytheas was a fucking tourist.


Tin had been traded for hundreds of years,...

All Pytheus did was follow a well established trade route.

The Amesbury Archer had made the journey from Mainland Europe, probably the Alps to Stone Henge, probably 700 years before, and Stonehenge was already old, even then.

Places like the neolithic Orkney sites and Stonehenge were built by an organised society, in Stonehenge's case ultimately to a plan, possibly based around the winter solstice sunset, possibly for cult/funeral rites purposes. The Ness of Brodgar contains the largest stone buildings if its type and time, in Nothern Europe.

:lol: Christopher Columbus was a bloody tourist then...

Time to revise Encyclopædia Britannica, you stupid dog! :lol:
y

Well if you cannot understand the less than subtle difference between someone following a route that had been followed for several thousand years by likely thousands of traders, and that may at the early stages have been overland, or at most coastal passage, close to land, as opposed to someone setting off on a totally uncharted route out of sight of land for many days, then you are more stupid than I thought. :D :D

As it is, the Vikings certainly reached a different part of the Americas by a different route, about 450 to 500 years before Columbus, Bristol Fisherman may have been fishing near the Newfoundland coast in about 1470, say 20 years before Columbus, and an Irish Monk may have beaten them all, if one interpretation of the Brendan Saga is correct. :D
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Re: Greek Tragedy

Postby supporttheunderdog » Tue Mar 21, 2017 11:59 am

No comment needed:

http://cyprus-mail.com/2017/03/21/greece-wont-last-eurozone-long-run/

Oh and by the Way, Himilco the Carthagenian was seemingly writing about and may have visited Albion, long before any Greek Tourist, then again before him was the Amesbury Archer.
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Re: Greek Tragedy

Postby kurupetos » Tue Mar 21, 2017 5:17 pm

supporttheunderdog wrote:No comment needed:

http://cyprus-mail.com/2017/03/21/greece-wont-last-eurozone-long-run/

Oh and by the Way, Himilco the Carthagenian was seemingly writing about and may have visited Albion, long before any Greek Tourist, then again before him was the Amesbury Archer.

The cockroaches were the first to visit Albion, dog. :mrgreen:
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Re: Greek Tragedy

Postby GreekIslandGirl » Wed Mar 22, 2017 12:26 am

supporttheunderdog wrote:No comment needed:

http://cyprus-mail.com/2017/03/21/greece-wont-last-eurozone-long-run/

Oh and by the Way, Himilco the Carthagenian was seemingly writing about and may have visited Albion, long before any Greek Tourist, then again before him was the Amesbury Archer.



:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

Still trying to push your pathetic, unrealistic vision of a post-Brexit Grexit, troll?

No chance!

The EU is back on target without divisive Britain on board. :P
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Re: Greek Tragedy

Postby supporttheunderdog » Wed Mar 22, 2017 12:58 pm

kurupetos wrote:
supporttheunderdog wrote:No comment needed:

http://cyprus-mail.com/2017/03/21/greece-wont-last-eurozone-long-run/

Oh and by the Way, Himilco the Carthagenian was seemingly writing about and may have visited Albion, long before any Greek Tourist, then again before him was the Amesbury Archer.

The cockroaches were the first to visit Albion, dog. :mrgreen:


After they gave up living in your arse?
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Re: Greek Tragedy

Postby supporttheunderdog » Wed Mar 22, 2017 1:24 pm

GreekIslandGirl wrote:
supporttheunderdog wrote:No comment needed:

http://cyprus-mail.com/2017/03/21/greece-wont-last-eurozone-long-run/

Oh and by the Way, Himilco the Carthagenian was seemingly writing about and may have visited Albion, long before any Greek Tourist, then again before him was the Amesbury Archer.



:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

Still trying to push your pathetic, unrealistic vision of a post-Brexit Grexit, troll?

No chance!

The EU is back on target without divisive Britain on board. :P


others are pushing it in the media, so I suggest you try your pathetic attempts at abuse on the Cyprus Mail or even better Bavarian Finance Minister Markus Soeder and the Handelsblatt newspaper....

So lets actually discuss some of the problems of Greece:

Here is good example in the Greek Press.

http://www.ekathimerini.com/216968/gallery/ekathimerini/community/how-millions-in-refugee-funds-were-wasted-in-greece


and usual it was someone elses' fault....
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Re: Greek Tragedy

Postby supporttheunderdog » Fri Mar 24, 2017 4:01 pm

and there is more

Greeks are pulling billions out of their banks in fear of new cash controls.

Greece's economy is shrinking again.

The country has not been able to put together a deal to pay off its next debt payment.


People are talking seriously about "Grexit" again.

Greece's banks lost about €4 billion in bank deposits since the turn of the year as Greeks fear a return of capital controls that ban them from making cash withdrawals over set limits. Separately, the country looks as if it is tipping back into recession — GDP shrank by 1.2% in Q4 2016.

Does this story sound familiar?

It should. A collapsing economy followed by a run on the banks were the signal events of the Greek debt crisis that began in 2009 and never really ended.


So now people are asking — again — whether Greece might be forced out of the eurozone:

Germany's Bavarian finance minister, Markus Soeder, said this week that “Greece is unlikely to survive in the eurozone over the long term.”
German opposition politician Christian Lindner said that Greece should abandon the euro and be offered debt relief.
And Pantheon Economics analyst Claus Vistesen wrote in a recent note to clients:
"Assets held by a benchmark Athens-based money market fund are down 11% in the past six months. This suggests that investors are beginning to price in the risk of a Greek exit from the Eurozone."

"... Households’ overnight deposits fell 1.1% year-over-year in January, indicating that liquidity in the private sector is drying up. Amazingly, Greece and its creditors are sleepwalking toward a repeat of the chaos in 2015, when capital controls were enforced to prevent a collapse of the banks."

Today, the ECB added another €400 million in emergency liquidity assistance to the Greek central bank, a move that "reflects developments in the liquidity situation of Greek banks, taking into account private sector deposit flows,” the ECB said.


http://uk.businessinsider.com/greece-debt-grexit-eurozone-imf-2017-3

And there is this

http://www.capital.gr/o-dimitris-papakonstantinou-grafei/3200000/sos-to-pagobou

All about the Tragedy that is the Greek economy

So is Dimitris Papakonstantinou an expat lying propagandist....?
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Re: Greek Tragedy

Postby supporttheunderdog » Fri Mar 24, 2017 10:24 pm

And the good news is that the Greek Primary surplus for 2016 is better than expected. Planned to be at 0.5%, some think it likely to be between 2 and 3%, with one estimate it might be 3.5%.
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Re: Greek Tragedy

Postby supporttheunderdog » Sat Mar 25, 2017 7:45 pm

An intersting item on discussion IN GREECE BY GREEKS contrasting the success of Cyprus in exiting a bail out while Greece still struggle, with criticism of the Greek Response. That in my view is a hopeful sign, identifying what the problems are.

https://www.euractiv.com/section/economy-jobs/news/greece-still-in-bailout-due-to-lack-of-political-consensus-spirit-among-parties/







(I am just wondering how this post and I will be described)
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