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what did greece do in 74 to help cyprus....

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what did greece do in 74 to help cyprus....

Postby boomerang » Fri Jun 01, 2012 5:06 pm

...apart for starting the problem, then walking away with her tail between her legs and head bowed down...
did she come to our rescue?...no
did she attack turkey?...no

what did greece do when the drilling started...nothing, a bit of verbal diarrhea...unlike real nations like israel...

so history tells us if any problems start you can't really tell me greece will come to our rescue...

the best move was getting chummy with the jews...real men, and not pussies...

the reziliki continues...
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Re: what did greece do in 74 to help cyprus....

Postby B25 » Fri Jun 01, 2012 5:33 pm

boomerang wrote: with the jews...real men, and not pussies..

oh, they have them too. Have you seen the female IDF, wow koumbare, they are real pussy ..... :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:
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Re: what did greece do in 74 to help cyprus....

Postby boomerang » Fri Jun 01, 2012 5:37 pm

B25 wrote:
boomerang wrote: with the jews...real men, and not pussies..

oh, they have them too. Have you seen the female IDF, wow koumbare, they are real pussy ..... :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

atleast they are real pussies and not drag queens like the greeks... :lol:

you are right though...nice...
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Re: what did greece do in 74 to help cyprus....

Postby Cap » Fri Jun 01, 2012 5:55 pm

ELDYK in Cyprus put up a good fight.
They also unofficially sent a coupla planes from Greece, of which one we shot down in the confusion.

I think that's about it.
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Re: what did greece do in 74 to help cyprus....

Postby barouti » Fri Jun 01, 2012 6:41 pm

boomerang wrote:...apart for starting the problem, then walking away with her tail between her legs and head bowed down...

Um, that was the Junta, those poustides who all died in prison like the dogs they were.

A little know fact, which thanks to the Greek leftists we don't hear much about. The Greek leftists yammer away about the Polytechnio as the catalyst for the fall of the Junta, but in fact that event was concocted that night so the Junta could have an excuse to get rid of Col. Papadopoulos. The Junta didnt fear these students. What they did fear was an uprising by sections of the armed forces ie within the Right and not the Left. The Velos mutiny of the Hellenic Navy was the first attempt to oust the Junta. It was a real threat because as I already mentioned it was within the armed forces and not the yelling and chest-beating of some ideologically-driven students who were absolutely no threat to the dictatorship. And what this did was make the Junta dogs paranoid. So when Turkey invaded Cyprus and war with Greece seemed inevitable, the reserves went to their allocated stores to get their weapons only to find them empty. Yep, the Junta dogs left Greece defenseless because they were afraid these stores would be used in a popular uprising against them. So yep, Greece was caught with her pants down, unlike 1964 when we were ready to rumble. Of course as a result of the failed coup in Cyprus and the British supported Turkish invasion, and the confusion that followed, the political machinations came into play. The American policy was to make sure there wasn't a war between two Nato nations at the height of the Cold War. It might sound lame to you, but Greece was coaxed not to go to war. Proof of this was the return of Constantine Karamanlis, an American lackey. He agreed to the Zurich agreement of 1960. Take note, George Papanedreou (not the dancing clown, his grandfather) was against it. But the Junta had pushed him out of Greek politics much to the satisfaction of the Americans and a true Hellenic hero died soon after. Anyway, Karamanlis would have most likely been "advised" by the Americans to sit back and they would take care of it. Oh well, let's not ponder on the "what ifs". Almost 40 years later, and despite the British, reuniting the island is both US and EU policy thanks to Greece.

did she come to our rescue?...no
did she attack turkey?...no


Eldyk fought valiantly for Cyprus. Together with the galant National Guard and despite the overwhelming odds, we prevented the Turks from taking Nicosia airport. And it was Eldyk that led to the Turks bombing their own warship Kotzatepe. As it happened, when Eldyk spotted the vessel they sent a fake radio message that fooled the Turks into thinking it was Greek. Well, they not only attacked their own warship but attempted to cover it up by renaming another vessel of the same class as Kotzatepe, but it didnt work. :lol:

what did greece do when the drilling started...nothing, a bit of verbal diarrhea...unlike real nations like israel...

Come on, man, your intelligent enough to know the answer. Why should we when Israel is in the picture. :twisted: No body fuks with zee Jews, and the Turks know this. Their fist-waving was purely for internal consumption. The average Turks is an ignorant peasant. Recently one of them found a dead bird tagged by Tel Aviv Uni and it made headlines that it was a spy sent by Israel. Nuff said about that. :lol:

1974 was an opportunity that the Turks grabbed. And the British supported it. Greece was in disarray. It's not an excuse but how it actually it was. It's been Greece who has made sure a resolution that the division is something to be resolved and not accepted. Greece could have easily said, okay you take the north and we take the south. We did not. Enosi still exists but not that between Greece and Cyprus (we've already achieved it through the EU) but about reuniting the island. And despite all the chest-beating and modern Turkey's only actually military action in 1974, it now remains a paper tiger. The Imia crisis in 1996 proved it. Despite Turkey at the time having the advantage in airpower, we stood our ground and it was the Turks who ran to the Americans to intervene. Anyone doubts me? Well, it's in Bill "I did not have sexual relations with that woman" Clinton's memiors:

Image

so history tells us if any problems start you can't really tell me greece will come to our rescue...

1974 yes, whose circumstances I explained above. 1964 proved otherwise as we were ready to roll for Cyprus, which prompted the Americans to threaten to isolate Turkey. Recently, when Cyprus was increasing ties with Israel, we spoke in the UN in support of Palestinian statehood. And let's not forget 2004 when we got Cyprus into the EU. Don't believe anything else, we threatened to block the then anticipated expansion of the EU if Cypriot membership was not accepted. Greece's politicians might have made a bordello of the economy but with foreign policy, mate, we've made all the right moves. Despite the rapproachment with Israel, the Arabs still like us more than the Turks.

the best move was getting chummy with the jews...real men, and not pussies...

Oh yeah, indeed the best move. Zee Turcos will not dare take on the zee Jews. Zee Jews do not want to be isolated and being chummy with two EU nations (well five if you include Bulgaria, Romania and guilt-ridden Germany) kind of tickles them. Besides, why is Israel such a pariah anyway. It's a Mediterranean democracy with an advanced economy. They're our natural allies.

the reziliki continues...

Now, now Boom-Boom, we have to be in this together :wink:
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Re: what did greece do in 74 to help cyprus....

Postby Maximus » Fri Jun 01, 2012 10:30 pm

what about the Zerg rush!
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Re: what did greece do in 74 to help cyprus....

Postby kimon07 » Fri Jun 01, 2012 11:53 pm

Cap wrote:ELDYK in Cyprus put up a good fight.
They also unofficially sent a coupla planes from Greece, of which one we shot down in the confusion. I think that's about it.

OPERATION "NIKI" 1974
A SUICIDE MISSION TO CYPRUS
By Mihail Solanakis

http://koti.welho.com/msolanak/kyprosengl.html

________________________________________

………….

This mission was to take place in secrecy, from Souda air base in Crete, with the purpose of carrying the 1st Commando Battalion and its equipment to Nicosia airport in Cyprus.It was given the codename ”Niki” (Victory).
20 ageing Nord 2501 Noratlas and 10 C-47 Dakotas, of the 354 Transport Squadron "Pegasus", were assigned to transport the commando force.
The transports would take off at night, with no fighter escort, fly in radio silence, at very low level, with minimum lights and no visual contact between aircraft.They would land in Nicosia, unload the force and take-off right away for the return to Greece.

The plan was, for the take-offs to start at 22.30 hrs of July 21, with a separation of 5’ between take-offs, so that all aircraft would be airborne by midnight.
The flight to Cyprus, the landing, unloading and return to base, should take place under cover of darkness to avoid detection by the Turkish Air Force.There were strict orders not to land in Nicosia in daylight.
On the night of 21st of July, all the assigned aircraft and the unit to be carried, were ready in the 115 Combat Wing base at Souda bay.
The take-off plan was kept by the first five aircraft, when delays started to occur (according to some opinions deliberate), with the result that the order was given to abort the remaining take-offs, leaving five Noratlas and all the Dakotas with the heavy equipment behind!
The last aircraft to take-off was ”Niki 15” (fifteenth in the take-off order), outside the time limits and having ignored the order to abort!
The aircraft that finally took-off, flew over the city of Chania, climbed to an altitude of 7000 ft over the White Mountains, and when over the sea, dropped to an altitude of 300-500 ft.They followed a south-eastern course, until a point approximately 34º N and 27º E, where they turned east in the direction of Cyprus.
The area ahead was monitored by the Turkish Air Force and the detection of the slow transports meant their certain destruction.
The Noratlas crews knew very well that in this mission they were alone, there was no friendly fighter escort for their protection.Their only protection was the darkness and the element of surprise.There were no navigational aids, these being shut down because of the outbreak of hostilities, and no reference points to take their bearings, so the skills of the navigators were critical.They did not fly in formation, but idependently and had no visual contact between them, the crews had only a general idea about where the preceding or following aircraft was!
Most of the aircraft had dropped to an altitude of no more than 40-50 ft., a very dangerous situation, where the slightest mistake from the pilot meant sudden death for the crew and occupants, on the surface of the Eastern Mediterranean.
The flight to Cyprus, was estimated to take around two hours for the slow and heavily laden Noratlas aircraft.Many of them, had all kinds of malfunctions, but their heroic crews pressed on, taking them to their destination.

Approaching Cyprus from the west and having broken the radio silence long ago, they noted the increased U.S 6th Fleet warship activity in the area south-west of the island.One of the Noratlas, reported having flown very near an aircraft carrier, without incident.
Other aircraft flew over the British base of Akrotiri which went on alert.The Command of the British Forces in Cyprus, warned that they will intercept any further overflights of the area.
Over the island, the aircraft climbed higher and their crews noted the large fires blazing on Mt Troodos, the result of the Turkish Air Force bombings of the previous day.These blazes were the source of the gleams of light on the horizon, that had helped them with their navigation earlier , when far out over the sea.
Some aircraft started to receive light arms fire from the Turkish Cypriot positions on the island, but the crews were not overly worried.
One by one, the heavily laden transports started their final approach to Nicosia airport losing progressively height.
Near the airport, they encountered heavy anti-aircraft fire, even though they knew the airport and the surrounding area was in Greek hands.The time was a little over 02.00, July the 22nd.
Before take off, at their briefing, the crews had been told that the Greek-Cypriot forces holding the Nicosia airport were informed for their coming and ordered not to open fire on their approach.
There are many conflicting reports about such an order being issued, who gave it, what it really said, or at what time it was sent out.
The fact is, that the aircraft trying to land, received a barrage of fire from positions inside and outside the airport.The fire came from Greek-Cypriot anti-aircraft positions, and from various other spots manned by civilians firing at the Noratlas transports, with all kinds of weapons.Later, it was learnt that all those firing at the approaching aircraft thought that they were Turkish, having heard nothing of any coming Greek reinforcements.
Aircraft ”Niki 1”,”Niki 2” and ”Niki 3”, under a hail of fire, managed to land and unload the commandos and their equipment.
Noratlas ”Niki 4” got hit by heavy AA fire, caught fire and crashed two miles before the runway.All on board, except one, were killed.”Niki 7”, received a direct hit on No 1 engine , and had No 2 on fire , but its heroic crew managed to land the aircraft.Two of the commandos on board got killed and 11 others were injured from the fire that almost tore the aircraft apart.Some of the Noratlas pilots, on their final approach, turned all their lights on, in a desperate effort to warn those firing from the ground about their nationality.This had little effect on those firing, but at least the last aircraft had no casualties even though they all carried the marks of the fire they received.
Belatedly, and after most of the aircraft had landed, the forces on the ground realised that the aircraft were friendly and the fire ceased . Unfortunately, too late for the 33 killed and the two Noratlas transports.
Last, and just before the first light, ”Niki 15” landed, carrying the heavy equipment of the 1st Commando Battalion.
All the aircraft that landed in Nicosia airport, took off immediately for the return flight, except of course, the unfortunate ”Niki 4” and three others:”Niki 3” which had engine problems and could not take off, the almost destroyed ”Niki 7”, and ”Niki 12”, that ran out of fuel.All three Noratlas aircraft were destroyed on the ground by Greek-Cypriot Forces, under orders of the Hellenic Air Force Headquarters, presumably as an attempt to erase all evidence of this symbolic Greek contribution to the Battle of Cyprus.
The pretense of course was, that Greece was not officially at war with Turkey!!
The rest of the aircraft, saving fuel and flying always very low, to avoid the Turkish Air Force that was soon to resume flying with the daylight, started to arrive in Souda , except 4 which landed in Rhodes, these being short on fuel or having sustained damage.
Two of the Noratlas that took off from Souda, never landed in Nicosia:”Niki 13”, after wandering over the sea, reported "navigation difficulties" and landed in Rhodes.”Niki 14”, arriving late over Cyprus and after the first light, followed the orders to the letter and turned back without landing.

In Nicosia, when daylight came the Turkish Air Force started to bomb the airport. The commandos of 1st Battalion that survived the nightmare of the previous night, took positions in the defence of the airport.In the days that followed they fought gallantly against the Turkish invaders.
Unfortunately, the heroic mission of the Hellenic Air Force was the only help from Greece to arrive in Cyprus at the time of crisis.
The heroism of those that took part, and the sacrifice of those killed during it, were not enough to alter the course of the events.
It will, nevertheless, be one of the brightest moments in the History of the Hellenic Air Force, albeit not fully recognised.
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Re: what did greece do in 74 to help cyprus....

Postby kimon07 » Sat Jun 02, 2012 12:03 am

Cap wrote:ELDYK in Cyprus put up a good fight.
They also unofficially sent a coupla planes from Greece, of which one we shot down in the confusion.I think that's about it.


The battle for Nicosia airport.
http://www.macedoniaontheweb.com/forum/ ... mando.html

The battle for Nicosia airport is still pretty much unknown in Greek military history. Most historical accounts of the events in Cyprus report that when Greek metropolitan and Greek Cypriot forces delivered the civil airport to UN forces the Turks attacked to seize it and engaged by UN forces. What is not known publicly is that before the UN takes control of the airport fierce battles between Greeks and Turks took place in the airport. Greeks the last moment saved the airport and handed it over in a military manner to UN. Our narrator is a Greek conscript sergeant of the Greek special raiding forces or LOKS as they are known who participated in the battle. A full special ops squadron was transferred by Noratlas cargo planes in Cyprus. Each of the 15 Noratlas was loaded with 30 raiders and 1500 kilos of ammo. Full history of the flight called operation Nike (Victory) will be posted soon. One Noratlas was shot down by friendly fire (Greek Cypriot AA guns) killing 27 raiders and crew. Flying from Crete in sea level to avoid Turkish radars without the escort of fighter jets was a suicide mission. The Noratlas’ Nike 6’ avoided the last minute collision to a US aircraft carrier. When finally the planes landed the raiders were regrouped and participated in classic special ops behind Turkish lines but also as elite infantry due to the heat of events and absence of other forces. One such battle is the battle for the airport.

Island of Crete

In our camp in Chania our A squadron was on alert since the government ordered general mobilization. The plan is known-send forces to Cyprus. At first the news is that B squadron from Macedonia will go to Cyprus. The time is passing and finally we got the order to go. We are to fly by Noratlas military cargo aircrafts. We repack our gear to be mission specific and have minimum loads due to aircraft regulations. One of the fifteen Noratlas will be loaded with the squadron’s heavy weapons. Our lieutenant throws his food cans and loads his Bergen with more than 300 bullets for his 45 pistol and FN FAL rifle. ‘Commandos’ he shouts the Cypriots will provide food on site. As a result we follow his lead and the whole place is stuffed with cans. Our bergen consists only ammo, a spare BDU and water canteens.

The announcement that we go to Cyprus sends us to heaven. We are singing all the time traditional Cretan songs. The morale is high. A fellow hospitalized commando when he hears that the squadron has a go, leaves the hospital and is coming to join and pick his gear.

21:00 hours - 20 July 1974. We are transported in military trucks going for Souda military airport. We pass through Cretan villages. Villagers are out in the streets shouting’ honor your weapons’. Older men, veterans of the Battle of Crete wearing their traditional vrakes (wide trousers) petting their moustaches smile with satisfaction. Many have sons serving in the squadron. Their children are going to continue their tradition. Our force is 360 men plus 60 combat divers from a unit covering the Aegean. Half of the combat divers are officers – instructors.

On the ground - Cyprus.

01:00 July 22. We try to recuperate from the loss of our friends during the landing. There is no time for thinking, we must take some sleep. It’s an unsound sleep and full of nightmares.

Morning - July 23. Archbishop School of Nicosia. Our company, 41 LOK gets orders to be at stand by. After a wild 42 LOK and finally all three companies are ready .We check our bergens and web gear. Weapons, radios, boobytrap devices, explosives and ammo plus food and water cans are at reach. We drink a coffee smoking a much appreciated cigarette. Finally we get the go. Our mission: protect Nicosia airport. Intel indicts that the Turks will advance forces to seize it. The airport is of strategic importance and is guarded by a company of Greek Cypriot raiders, a company of the Greek Contigent in Cyprus (ELDYK) and the airport’s police guard armed with 106 recoilless rifles.The airport is 2 km behind the confrontation zone. We board some old city buses driven by Cypriot MPs. We lie down so the buses look empty. We split to four parties and we go to the airport by different roads so no one can predict that this is a joint force with a joint objective.We move parallel to the frontline and we arrive at the airport. About 500 meters at 3 o’clock we see military trucks unloading infantry troops. Ours or Turks? Can’t say from this distance but they also don’t seem to recognize us. It doesn’t matter, we are inside. I am a radio operator carrying an Israeli made GRC 25 but also a medic to cover the losses of the landing.

Battle positions.

Commandos soon begun to assume battle positions. Our lieutenant, a sergeant, seven LMGs, one MG plus three 90 mm recoilless rifles, one sniper and me quickly go to the roof of the airport’s main hall. We walk bending and post our weapons. In the roof we find already posted a LMG and a MG with Cypriot raiders.

My company’s firing line is vertical to the Turkish axis of attack. Our lieutenant instructs the 2 MGs to let the Turks come close enough to a wide area so the 8 LMGs will reap them out. In this way a death zone is created since the area is clear with no vegetation or something to cover.
Inside the well-hole the sniper observes through his sniper scope and begins to report valuable info. Our lieutenant sees with his binoculars. I take the signal from the radio: LOKS ready to fight. The tar on the roof begins to melt. Raiders swim in their sweat.Temperature more than 40 C. The Turks notice our positions and the fighting begins. 43 LOK fires first and sequentially all airport defenders join. A raider and a Cypriot MP are wounded slightly. We have also some old M-8 APC’s courtesy of airports police. My company has a UN camp directly at 12 o clock so we will hit the attacking Turks from aside. We have no fear of a direct attack due to the presence of the UN camp. Our only concerns are the Turkish air force and mortars. The Turks probably thought that the airport was defended only by Cypriots and so did the UN. They can not know that three companies slipped from the city in buses under their noses. I must say that the Cypriot raiders did miracles and won all the battles they fought.

But we are with the finger on the trigger. Turks are preparing full attack with infantry and tanks. The lieutenant, a compatriot from Evia says to me:’ Patriotaki’ they are ****ed. They don’t know we’re here. They are sanding troops to every direction. It will be a slaughter’.

Continuous attacks

Indeed Turks spread and attack. About 150 of them in every direction begun to advance. Both 42 and 43 LOKs fire at them at 12 o’clock we hit them from their side. It’s hell. No Turk from this first wave survives as I see it. Some only at the back begun to retreat and take cover inside a small park near to the UN camp with the hope we won’t shoot at this direction. I look around and see the lieutenant. One hand holds the binoculars, the other rests on his rather large fighting knife he carries. He smiles under his moustache with satisfaction-probably for the outcome. What happens sir I ask, are they leaving? No sergeant they are just regrouping. Haven’t you heared the infamous Ottoman jurusia? If they got their lesson and calculated our fire they will come back probably with a battalion strong and more so it would be more difficult. Before I realize his thought a shell explodes a thousand meters behind me. The lieutenant immediately finds azimuth with his compass and he orders me to write it. Soon a second shell explodes in the same line but 200 meters closer to us, so he orders me to report that we are taking fire by 4.2 mortars with direction the opposite of the azimuth. The Turks having the UN camp in the front can’t shoot our side directly so they are firing mortars progressively every 200 meters until they hit the building. One Turkish shell destroys a civil aircraft 500 meters from the building.Then quiet. ‘It looks they have no other shells’ a sergeant says smiling. Sergeant they are coming again FIRE!! FIRE!! the lieutenant screams. More attacks at the hot zone. I see body parts flying all over -the remaining pool back. The M-8s are going to a counter attack firing at them. The Turks who are sheltered near the UN camp try to create us a headache. We fire a barrage of M79 white phosphorus grenades and the bushes take fire. They are burning alive. There is an abandoned house up in a hill and they try to use it as an observation post. The sniper shouts: ‘People inside the house 1800-2000m’. They are out of range for the recoilless rifles. Something needs to be done. The sniper fires two shots. A 90 mm recoilless rifle crew takes position. The lieutenant instructs the shooter to hold the 90mm steady raising it 45 degrees above the usual fire position. Target beyond maximum range.
Fire!!- The whole place shakes. ‘ALL DOWN’ the lieutenant’s voice is piercing. Suddenly a MG burst strikes the roof. Luckily no one is hurt. The sniper reports that the 90mm hit 200 meters from the house. The Turks are leaving it, they thought it was a mortar. Why don’t they use their tanks?
The day passes with more wave attacks with the same results. During pauses commandos fieldstrip the LMG's and clean the gas regulators because they jam from continuous fire. Turkish yurusia are coming again again. But our calculated fire is lethal.You see 3 of our officers are members of the official shooting team of the Greek raiding forces and they have trained us superbly. My lieutenant’s motto is: ‘When you believe the bullet you fire, your fear takes a walk’.

Disengagement

Its afternoon and UN forces arrive at the airport. Orders from Greek Cypriot command are CEASE FIRE. At least a battalion of Canadian soldiers armed and escorted by APC’S are coming to stop the battle and take control of the airport. Their commander, a lieutenant colonel ignores our commander and doesn’t talk to him as is the proper military protocol. He bypasses him giving him an ironic glance saying: What do Greek raiders do here? Furious from this remark a raider raises his FN fal and fires at him in point blank range. Miraculously the FAL jams and other raiders disarm him quickly. If the UN commander was killed like that we would be in tons of trouble. During negotiations our sniper reports suspicious activity. Our lieutenant observes with caution and sees that during the negotiations Turks are trying to advance this time with tanks. He orders me to radio back the Greek Cypriot command and they realize that they play games against us. The UN commander demands us to leave first and when the airport is empty UN troops are to enter. His sympathy to Turks is obvious. If we leave he will let the advancing Turks to take the airport. We won the battle, the place is full of Turkish corpses and yet the Turks must prevail as winners. Not to mention the fact that we have no cover if we leave. It’s a method commonly used as we found out later by the British forces that openly collaborated with the Turks despite serving under UN. But if the UN officially takes control as we demand can’t deliver it to the Turks.

Luckily our sniper spots the Turks and warns us.’ Commandos listen up’ the voice of our lieutenant is dominant:’ Load and prepare’. A UN officer will come with a radio man. They must believe that if the Turks won’t retreat we will break the cease fire. Indeed a UN lieutenant with a radio operator equipped with a US made GRC radio are coming to the roof. The two lieutenants talk some time when our guy shouts ungry making gestures. The UN guy begs: please sir just a minute: Our officer is out of control or he is playing it real nice?’ Commandos ARM’. Other UN officers the same time are talking to Turks. Finally our officer shows his five fingers and says’ five minutes’.’ Ok Sir Ok Sir’ replies the UN guy and begins to talk to the radio. Finally an agreement is reached and Turks return to their original positions. Our replacement is taking place normally by UN. Man to man, platoon to platoon, company to company as all world armies do. We go last of the roof with the lieutenant who cheques constantly the area. We pass the corridor and I see the airport’s vault. Sir we must deliver the vault to the Cypriot command. ‘Listen patriotaki’ he says and write it down inside your brain: We came to fight Turks; we won’t pollute our hands with money. ‘Stay away’. I can’t forget his words. When we are about to leave I try to communicate with the others but it’s impossible; People talk in every frequency. But my Israeli made GRC has extra frequencies unreachable by the US made radios. Finally all radio operators turn to a pre-arranged frequency and we manage to coordinate our forces.

We arrive in Nicosia and rest to an abandoned camp. The same night BBC reports that Greek Cypriots assisted by Greek metropolitan forces defended the airport inflicting heavy casualties to the Turks. Probably is a report by British journalist Philips who was present at the airport but was drawn away by our commander for his personal safety. Later I heard he was killed during a mission. Petty, he was a noble man. Our casualties are a master sergeant dead and a raider wounded. The master sergeant Photopoulos Athanasios was killed when he left his barricaded position and started walking towards the attacking waves firing his rifle from the hip full auto . Raider Andrulakis had his right arm amputated after receiving a round in the shoulder. The shot was fired by the Canadians from the UN controlled area and our people fired back.

Turkish casualties are a question. Cypriots intercepted a signal to the Turkish commander at the airport. He was asked why he had so many casualties with no success. I remember that after two weeks Turks attacked again despite the cease fire but intercepted by UN troops

Today almost 20 years later, often I recollect the events. My mind remembers my dead and wounded friends. They wrote history with their heroism. We did our duty. The rest is a job for historians.
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Re: what did greece do in 74 to help cyprus....

Postby kimon07 » Sat Jun 02, 2012 12:45 am

Cap wrote:ELDYK in Cyprus put up a good fight.
They also unofficially sent a coupla planes from Greece, of which one we shot down in the confusion.I think that's about it.



21 July 1974
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Military_o ... _of_Cyprus

In the evening, the ruling Junta in Athens agreed upon an arrangement to dispatch clandestine reinforcements to assist the Greek Cypriots, in the form of an infantry battalion, a commando battalion and a battalion of medium tanks. An initial effort was made to dispatch these forces using the large vehicle ferry Rethymnon, which took onboard the 537th Infantry battalion, a battalion of tanks and 500 Cypriot volunteers (primarily EOKA-B supporters). This vessel set sail from Piraeus that evening.[10]


1. The mission of this ship is mentioned also in the findings of the RoC parliamentary committee.
2. The GC volunteers on board were not EOKA-B supporters. They (we) were students, most of us Grivas supporters.
3. We were intercepted and turned back by the 6th fleet just about 20 miles off Paphos.
4. According to a lawyer friend of mine, her father, serving as a captain of the Greek army during that period, her father and the infantry unit he was serving in at that time, were on board another transport ship which was following the Rethymnon from a distance and was also ordered back.
5. As it is recorded in the minutes of the investigation committees of both the Greek and the CY parliaments, two greek submarines had been ordered twice to strike the invading force and the order was recalled both times. Additionally, greek F-4 Phantoms were re stationed to Crete in order to be sent to strike the invading force. The order was given twice but both times it was revoked after a while.
Both parliaments fail to determine, in their findings, WHY the orders were revoked. But most people suspect the reasons. Just to mention that the pussy generals who revoked the orders were promoted by the government of Karamanlis to the highest ranks of the Greek armed forces instead of being shot in the head.

The same he did with the pussy NOATLAS pilot who, instead of flying all the way to Cyprus with his commandos, obeyed the abort order and went to Rodes. The pilot of the plane which was carrying the ammunition and the heavy weapons of the 1st commando, (NIKI 17) disregarded the order and landed in Nicosia so as not to let the raiders without their ammo and heavy weapons. He was never promoted to higher ranks and was discharged prematurely.

The captain of the landing/transport Lesvos who braught his ship back to the port of Paphos, let out the ELDYK soldiers who had been discharged and were returning to Greece, shelld the TC enclave and thus helped the National Guard to capture it and who thus added the confusion which resulted to the bombing by the Turks of their own destroyers, was appointed by the government of Karamanlis as military attache in Turkey(!!). He was killed in a "car accident" in Thrace while on his way to Turkey after one of his trips home for vacation.
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Re: what did greece do in 74 to help cyprus....

Postby boomerang » Sat Jun 02, 2012 1:01 am

barouti, there was a double enosis scheeme between greece and turkey...hence after so may years not making the cyprus file available...they thought it would have been a walk in the park...

regarding the imia crisis, yes the turks complained to clinton, and the yanks ordered the greeks to back off leaving the imia unresolved, with greece losing sovereignity...to this date is a grey area...why is that?...

mighty greece to this very date can't declare 12 nautical miles...what is the excuse here?

i am teeling you a pussy nation that can't be depended to come to anynones rescue since they can't even look after their own sovereiginity...

so forgeting cyprus for a minute, the greeks are 2 time pussies when it comes to greece...

and since this reziliki, watch the turks walk all over them and declare half the aegean...mark my words on this one...coz the greeks would sell their own mum for peanuts...

greeks today are cashing on the glory of the ancients....the real chronology is from ancient warriors to modern day pussies...

today they became bitches to europe....they lied and cheated to get in the eurozone, abused the system, got found out and today they will have a new master regardless if they stay in the eurozone or not...greeks need a master...

IMHO in order to save greece from total annihilation, cyprus must do a secret deal with the turks with the splitting of greece...we will take from athhens and below and the turks can have from athens and above...ofcourse turks leave cyprus in this deal...otherwise no deal and turks can have the headache of owing the juvenille delinquents exclusively... :lol:

we owe greece this much...i call it a rescue plan.... :lol:

barouti, i know you and you know me...in all this time no one mentioned imia crisis in this forum except from me, and now you...and you call me boom boom...only a couple of people call me that... :D

koumbare does this make sense to you?
"The accumulated filth of all their sex and murder foams up about their waists. And all the whores and polititians will look up and shout "Save us" and I'll look down and whisper 'No'."

if it does, man what happened to you?...what happened to everyone?...
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