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Archeology/History Thread

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Re: Archeology/History Thread

Postby yialousa1971 » Fri Aug 23, 2013 7:07 pm

Get Real! wrote:See if you can find any in Somalia and Bangladesh… I’ll go look in Burkina Faso! :lol:


You're a Moron. :wink:
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Re: Archeology/History Thread

Postby GreekIslandGirl » Fri Aug 23, 2013 7:28 pm

History trivia - I am related to Marie Antoinette on my mum's side! 8)
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Re: Archeology/History Thread

Postby Cap » Fri Aug 23, 2013 7:38 pm

GreekIslandGirl wrote:History trivia - I am related to Marie Antoinette on my mum's side! 8)


It makes sense, that's probably where you got your brains from.
Either France or Cyprus.
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Re: Archeology/History Thread

Postby DrCyprus » Fri Aug 23, 2013 7:44 pm

GreekIslandGirl wrote:History trivia - I am related to Marie Antoinette on my mum's side! 8)



We didn't see any French haplogroups in your DNA report.
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Re: Archeology/History Thread

Postby Get Real! » Fri Aug 23, 2013 9:57 pm

GreekIslandGirl wrote:History trivia - I am related to Marie Antoinette on my mum's side! 8)

It’s a bit too late to distance yourself from Greece or reinvent yourself altogether because you’re stuck in a Hellenic myth where all roads lead to the Ottomans. :lol:
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Re: Archeology/History Thread

Postby Cap » Fri Aug 23, 2013 10:20 pm

All roads lead to Cyprus mate.
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Re: Archeology/History Thread

Postby GreekIslandGirl » Fri Aug 23, 2013 11:23 pm

Get Real! wrote:
GreekIslandGirl wrote:History trivia - I am related to Marie Antoinette on my mum's side! 8)

It’s a bit too late to distance yourself from Greece or reinvent yourself altogether because you’re stuck in a Hellenic myth where all roads lead to the Ottomans. :lol:


No distancing required! All connected. 95% European here. Only modern day identifiable ethnicity is Greece and Cyprus tracked - equally! 8)
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Re: Archeology/History Thread

Postby GreekIslandGirl » Fri Aug 23, 2013 11:24 pm

GreekIslandGirl wrote:
Get Real! wrote:
GreekIslandGirl wrote:History trivia - I am related to Marie Antoinette on my mum's side! 8)

It’s a bit too late to distance yourself from Greece or reinvent yourself altogether because you’re stuck in a Hellenic myth where all roads lead to the Ottomans. :lol:


No distancing required! All connected. 95% European here. Only modern day identifiable ethnicity is Greece and Cyprus tracked - equally! 8)


(Leads right back to Prince Philip ... :? )
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Re: Archeology/History Thread

Postby yialousa1971 » Sat Sep 21, 2013 5:15 pm

Mycenean Palace and Linear B Tablets Discovered in Sparta Area

By A. Papapostolou on September 11, 2013 in News
Image


A new excavation in the Xirokambi area of Aghios Vassilios west of Sparta, in the Peloponnese, Greece, has revealed a richness of Mycenean artefacts in the area, including the remains of a palace, Linear B tablets, fragments of wall paintings, and several bronze swords.
The excavation, led by emeritus ephor of antiquities Adamantia Vassilogrambrou, was presented publicly at the biennial Shanghai Archaeology Forum at the end of August as one of 11 sites showcased from different parts of the world.

The Aghios Vassilios excavation began in 2010, after Linear B tablets were found in the area in 2008, pointing to the existence of a powerful central authority and distribution system. The deciphered texts were devoted to perfume and cloth production, the trade of which was controlled by a palace administration in the Mycenean era.

Evidence of a central palace administration was confirmed also by the architecture, which is dated to the 14th century BC, while contact with Crete was confirmed by the finding of a double axe, a feature of the island’s palace culture.

Artefacts found include seals, a multitude of ceramic and bronze vessels, and 21 bronze swords. According to the evidence, a sudden fire that broke out either at the end of the 14th century or the beginning of the 13th destroyed the three buildings on the site which were never rebuilt at the same location.
(source: ana-mpa)

http://greece.greekreporter.com/2013/09 ... arta-area/
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Re: Archeology/History Thread

Postby supporttheunderdog » Sat Sep 21, 2013 6:36 pm

There is a lot of good archeology in Cyprus too.
image.jpg

From Famagusta Gazette.

Fine plaster floors, large amounts of broken pottery, and other objects, such as stone tools for processing food and other materials, gaming stones, copper chisels, and shell, stone and bone pendants and beads, were among the findings of the 2013 season of excavations at the Bronze Age settlement of Kissonerga-Skalia near Paphos.

The excavation was carried out during July by a University of Manchester team under the direction of Dr Lindy Crewe.

The team uncovered further evidence of a large building complex dating to the threshold of the Late Cypriot Bronze Age (around 1750–1600 BC), which had been partially revealed in previous seasons and also investigated a series of floors in an earlier domestic area dating to the Early Bronze Age (around 2300–1900 BC).

During the final phase of occupation a large complex covering an area of 750 square metres was built, using a variety of techniques with thick stone wall foundations up to 1.2 metres wide.

A large wall of uncertain function now extends to over 45 metres long and is not yet fully excavated.

After the previous season, the wall enclosed an area of around 20 x 10 metres, but this season it has turned back on itself to form an ‘S-shape’.

The team has revealed a large courtyard with a plaster floor on which were found plastered pits, pottery, weights and spindle whorls and evidence for large-scale industrial activities.

The space to the southwest of the courtyard wall has now been partially excavated and further walls were revealed, subdividing the area. As with all the architecture in the final phase at Kissonerga-Skalia, the walls do not form right angles, creating a parallelogram rather than a rectangular space.

Within this space, a heavily disturbed line of small stones with mud plaster chunks seems to represent the remains of an interior bench running along the wall.

Upon the floor an unusually high concentration of fine ware pottery bowls and small juglets were found in the typical local styles of Drab Polished ware and Red Polished ware and it may be a domestic space.

It is not clear what kinds of industrial activities were undertaken in other areas of the site but two large storage jars partially embedded in the ground were found adjacent to deep, narrow pits filled with charcoal, along with a small stone-built structure that was filled with fine ashy soil.

In other areas of the site the team investigated earlier domestic structures and there is now evidence for a sequence of five floors, mainly of mud but with two of plaster, separated by layers of dumped material, probably to level the area prior to refurbishing.

Pottery styles found indicate a long occupation from the beginning of the Early Cypriot Bronze Age and also attest to contacts with other parts of the island. Unfortunately, this is an area heavily disturbed by pits of a later date.

The latest floor in this area is dated through the pottery to Early Cypriot III–Middle Cypriot I or Middle Cypriot II and it would appear that Area D was left vacant during the final occupation phase at the site, possibly a source of building material as this may be one explanation for the many pits.

During the 2013 season, two lower floor levels were removed, revealing a series of fine plaster floors, a plaster basin and early architecture on a north-south orientation, in contrast to the later northwestern-southeastern orientation typical of the site.

Beneath this sequence of floors there is a final plaster floor above the sterile subsoil which remains to be excavated in future seasons.

Along with the typical finds of large amounts of broken pottery, other objects associated with the architecture investigated this season include stone tools for processing food and other materials, gaming stones, copper chisels and shell, stone and bone pendants and beads. — (KYPE)
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