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Turk woman ordered to pay for abusive husband's swollen hand

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Re: Turk woman ordered to pay for abusive husband's swollen

Postby Paphitis » Mon Jan 11, 2016 5:55 am

Zenon33 wrote:Unfortunately, domestic violence exists around the world.
In nordic countries the problem is worse, there are more women raped and murdered than Cyprus and other mediterranean countries.


No it's not worse at all.

They are better at detecting it and with dealing it than are countries like Cyprus which still to this day has a culture in condoning domestic violence and blaming the victim.

Cyprus has some way to catch up, but it is certainly not the worse. Certainly not as progressed as Western Europe or the Nordic Countries which have had a successful feminist movement which I admit was needed and has helped many countries make positive changes for the good but you continue to dismiss this progress and have a tendency to blame feminists and women more generally for what is nothing more than better detection from better education and support and stricter laws for the protection of women in violent relationships.

Cyprus is not there yet.

In fact, if you had all the feminist initiated support services, the education, as well as that level of law enforcement, you will quickly discover how much of a problem Cyprus has due to various cultural factors which put women behind the eight ball by quite a lot!
Last edited by Paphitis on Mon Jan 11, 2016 6:08 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Turk woman ordered to pay for abusive husband's swollen

Postby Paphitis » Mon Jan 11, 2016 6:00 am

repulsewarrior wrote:...so it appears, although i wonder what the differences are in reporting such incidences, how these reports are treated, and by who.

...i would suggest that in the northern countries, they can keep better records, and do.

..."honour", has a lot to do with it, although we can see a big difference between its meanings; in Turkey with this decision, and the rest of the world where beating another person, woman, wife, or daughter, if you are a man, or a husband, would be frowned upon, to say the least.


Yes honour violence is a very big factor in Cyprus but obviously not as bad as Muslim Countries. Western Europe does not have this as a cultural influence.

Feminist Groups in Cyprus have identified "family honour" as a big factor and many instances of violence still go unreported because women are more inclined to live in fear in Cyprus than they are in many countries because of the blame the victim mentality, less education about the problem, and less support in helping women get out of these situations because they don't get the counselling they require or the financial assistance and are as a result "trapped".
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Re: Turk woman ordered to pay for abusive husband's swollen

Postby Paphitis » Mon Jan 11, 2016 6:04 am

B25 wrote:
Paphitis wrote:
And here are all the Government support services for victims.

http://www.cyprus.gov.cy/portal/portal. ... =0&lang=en


Could you now give such services in Turkey???

Your argument is weak and irrelevant, abuse is would wide, but nowhere, where the victim is persecuted to pay the aggressor compensation, FFS.

Hade re Paphiti, usually to talk a lot of sense, just admit you failed on this one.



I'm not comparing to Turkey. I never said Cyprus was worse than Turkey. Neither am I accusing or criticising Cyprus.

I am responding to the stupid remarks insinuating that Cyprus is better off than the Nordic Countries which I find ridiculous. I am also responding to the lunacy where certain misogynists have identified feminists as the main culprits for violence against women. You couldn't get more absurd.

It's also quite sad that misogyny is alive and very well in Cyprus.

I know what is right and what is wrong B25 and one of my pet hates is violence against women. I also recognize that women have a lot more to deal with than us men and a lot more obstacles but it is getting better.
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Re: Turk woman ordered to pay for abusive husband's swollen

Postby miltiades » Mon Jan 11, 2016 9:19 am

You were born in Australia, have visited Cyprus on a few occasions, have never interacted at length with the Cyprus way of life and you clearly make statements out of your arse.

I have never encountered a situation where violence against women is evident in any form. The Cypriot women are liberated, they are modern women who would not tolerate any form of violence against them, coupled with the fact that the Cypriots in general have a high regard for their mothers, grandmothers unties cousins etc,

You know fuck about Cyprus just as you know fuck all about anything else. But you do of course know a great deal about the wonderful admirable way of life in the....ME.
Plonker of Arabia suits you down to your ...arse.
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Re: Turk woman ordered to pay for abusive husband's swollen

Postby Paphitis » Mon Jan 11, 2016 9:24 am

miltiades wrote:You were born in Australia, have visited Cyprus on a few occasions, have never interacted at length with the Cyprus way of life and you clearly make statements out of your arse.

I have never encountered a situation where violence against women is evident in any form. The Cypriot women are liberated, they are modern women who would not tolerate any form of violence against them, coupled with the fact that the Cypriots in general have a high regard for their mothers, grandmothers unties cousins etc,

You know fuck about Cyprus just as you know fuck all about anything else. But you do of course know a great deal about the wonderful admirable way of life in the....ME.
Plonker of Arabia suits you down to your ...arse.


Yes but you have your head stuck up your arse too.

I never encountered situations where violence against women was prevalent either, but that's the thing now isn't it. You don't know who is suffering in silence or who is about to pop themselves because of it.

It's there, and it is condoned to some certain extent because we Cypriots still have a fair way to go to achieve the required understanding of the problem.
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Re: Turk woman ordered to pay for abusive husband's swollen

Postby die7 » Mon Jan 11, 2016 9:59 am

miltiades wrote:
I have never encountered a situation where violence against women is evident in any form. The Cypriot women are liberated, they are modern women who would not tolerate any form of violence against them, coupled with the fact that the Cypriots in general have a high regard for their mothers, grandmothers unties cousins etc,


This would be the joke of the year - if it wouldn't be so awfully sad. Please open your mouth only if what you are going to say is more beautiful than the silence. A world wide known psychiatrist once said:
'People don't want to see the truth, because their biggest fear is to get their illusions destroyed.''

http://in-cyprus.com/fighting-violence-against-women-in-cyprus/
http://in-cyprus.com/cyprus-criticised-over-domestic-abuse/
http://www.medinstgenderstudies.org/report-presentation-violence-against-women-in-the-context-of-political-transformations-and-economic-crisis-in-the-euro-mediterranean-region/
http://old.cyprusnewsreport.com/?q=node/8401

You need more? But reading your comments in this forum, I'm sure there are no facts that will ever make you think about reality. Eyes are useless if the mind is blind.
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Re: Turk woman ordered to pay for abusive husband's swollen

Postby Zenon33 » Mon Jan 11, 2016 5:54 pm

miltiades wrote:You were born in Australia, have visited Cyprus on a few occasions, have never interacted at length with the Cyprus way of life and you clearly make statements out of your arse.

I have never encountered a situation where violence against women is evident in any form. The Cypriot women are liberated, they are modern women who would not tolerate any form of violence against them, coupled with the fact that the Cypriots in general have a high regard for their mothers, grandmothers unties cousins etc,

You know fuck about Cyprus just as you know fuck all about anything else. But you do of course know a great deal about the wonderful admirable way of life in the....ME.
Plonker of Arabia suits you down to your ...arse.



I couldn't agree with you more.
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Re: Turk woman ordered to pay for abusive husband's swollen

Postby Paphitis » Mon Jan 11, 2016 6:08 pm

Zenon33 wrote:
miltiades wrote:You were born in Australia, have visited Cyprus on a few occasions, have never interacted at length with the Cyprus way of life and you clearly make statements out of your arse.

I have never encountered a situation where violence against women is evident in any form. The Cypriot women are liberated, they are modern women who would not tolerate any form of violence against them, coupled with the fact that the Cypriots in general have a high regard for their mothers, grandmothers unties cousins etc,

You know fuck about Cyprus just as you know fuck all about anything else. But you do of course know a great deal about the wonderful admirable way of life in the....ME.
Plonker of Arabia suits you down to your ...arse.



I couldn't agree with you more.


Could it be because women are not empowered as much in Cyprus to be able to report abuse?

I think so ...

Women are more empowered in other countries.

But there you have it folks. Zenon couldn't agree more with Miltiades. 2 ignorant dingbats at their best!

Laws prohibit rape and spousal rape in the Republic of Cyprus. There has been a sharp increase in the number of these crimes in the 2000s.[2] Although sexual harassment in the workplace is prohibited, it is a widespread problem, but only few cases are reported to the authorities.[2]

In 1996, the UN Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination Against Women, Concluding Observations noted that women were not represented in political life much, they were absent from higher levels of the government, the trafficking of women and their sexual exploitation was against human rights, there was sexual harassment in the workplace, and women were not paid equal money for work of equal value.[18]

The committee also said:

"The Committee exhorts the Government to extend full social security coverage to self-employed rural women and to abolish existing discrimination in this respect between married and unmarried women. The Committee urges the Government to implement special sensitization and training programmes in gender issues for all law enforcement officials and judges, particularly judges in family courts. The Committee strongly recommends that urgent special temporary measures be adopted, under article 4 of the Convention, with the aim of substantially increasing the presence of women in all areas of public and political life, as well as actively promoting their position in the senior management of the civil service and in the diplomatic service. The Committee urges the Government to explore the proposal of non-governmental organizations to establish an equal opportunities commission to deal with complaints by women and to serve in a mediatory capacity."[18]

In 2006, the same committee expressed their concern about discrimination against women migrants, including domestic helpers and agricultural workers, lower number of women which have the PhD degree when compared with men, and "the lack of a comprehensive and systematic approach to gender equality policies".[19]

A US Department of State report in 2010 stated that:

"On January 7, the ECHR ruled in Rantsev v. Cyprus and Russia that Cyprus failed to protect 20-year-old Russian cabaret artist Oxana Rantseva from human trafficking and failed to conduct an effective investigation into the circumstances of her death in 2001."[2]


Prostitution is rife in Cyprus, and the island has been criticized for its role in the sex trade as one of the main routes of human trafficking from Eastern Europe.[28][29]

In May 2011, the UN Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights said that rejected asylum-seekers were kept for too long in detention and inconvenient conditions.[30] In May 2005, the KISA accused the police of violating the law and the human rights of asylum seekers by carrying out illegal arrests, detentions, and deportations.[8] Another non-governmental organization (NGO) reported in 2005 that the police deported long term residents, as long as 11 years.[8]

A large number of Romanian nationals were subjected to forced labor in the country in 2009.[31] In August 2009 the UNHCR complained through the media that a Kurdish child suffering from a terminal congenital condition was denied government funding to travel abroad for medical treatment because of his refugee status, in contravention of the country's refugee law, which provides refugees access to the same medical treatment as Cypriots and other EU citizens.[2] detention by occupying the water-tank tower of the prison in Nicosia and a hunger strike in Limassol.[32]

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
The Republic of Cyprus is a constitutional republic and multi-party presidential
democracy. In February voters elected President Nicos Anastasiades in free and
fair elections. In 2011 voters elected 56 representatives to the 80-seat House of
Representatives (Vouli Antiprosopon) in free and fair elections. Authorities
maintained effective control over the security forces. Security forces reportedly
committed some human rights abuses.
The most significant problems during the year remained trafficking in persons for
sexual exploitation and labor, police abuse and degrading treatment of persons in
custody and asylum seekers, and violence against women including spousal abuse.
Other problems during the year included prison overcrowding, some religious
groups lacked full access to and administration of religious sites, some cemeteries
and places of worship were reportedly inaccessible and neglected, incidents of
violence against children, and instances of discrimination and violence against
members of minority ethnic and national groups.
The government investigated and prosecuted corruption and abuse cases against
officials, but cases typically moved at a slow pace.


http://www.state.gov/documents/organization/220477.pdf

I must apologize for the American Source once again. Must be another American conspiracy.
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Re: Turk woman ordered to pay for abusive husband's swollen

Postby miltiades » Mon Jan 11, 2016 6:35 pm

Paphitis wrote:
Zenon33 wrote:
miltiades wrote:You were born in Australia, have visited Cyprus on a few occasions, have never interacted at length with the Cyprus way of life and you clearly make statements out of your arse.

I have never encountered a situation where violence against women is evident in any form. The Cypriot women are liberated, they are modern women who would not tolerate any form of violence against them, coupled with the fact that the Cypriots in general have a high regard for their mothers, grandmothers unties cousins etc,

You know fuck about Cyprus just as you know fuck all about anything else. But you do of course know a great deal about the wonderful admirable way of life in the....ME.
Plonker of Arabia suits you down to your ...arse.



I couldn't agree with you more.


Could it be because women are not empowered as much in Cyprus to be able to report abuse?

I think so ...

Women are more empowered in other countries.

But there you have it folks. Zenon couldn't agree more with Miltiades. 2 ignorant dingbats at their best!

Laws prohibit rape and spousal rape in the Republic of Cyprus. There has been a sharp increase in the number of these crimes in the 2000s.[2] Although sexual harassment in the workplace is prohibited, it is a widespread problem, but only few cases are reported to the authorities.[2]

In 1996, the UN Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination Against Women, Concluding Observations noted that women were not represented in political life much, they were absent from higher levels of the government, the trafficking of women and their sexual exploitation was against human rights, there was sexual harassment in the workplace, and women were not paid equal money for work of equal value.[18]

The committee also said:

"The Committee exhorts the Government to extend full social security coverage to self-employed rural women and to abolish existing discrimination in this respect between married and unmarried women. The Committee urges the Government to implement special sensitization and training programmes in gender issues for all law enforcement officials and judges, particularly judges in family courts. The Committee strongly recommends that urgent special temporary measures be adopted, under article 4 of the Convention, with the aim of substantially increasing the presence of women in all areas of public and political life, as well as actively promoting their position in the senior management of the civil service and in the diplomatic service. The Committee urges the Government to explore the proposal of non-governmental organizations to establish an equal opportunities commission to deal with complaints by women and to serve in a mediatory capacity."[18]

In 2006, the same committee expressed their concern about discrimination against women migrants, including domestic helpers and agricultural workers, lower number of women which have the PhD degree when compared with men, and "the lack of a comprehensive and systematic approach to gender equality policies".[19]

A US Department of State report in 2010 stated that:

"On January 7, the ECHR ruled in Rantsev v. Cyprus and Russia that Cyprus failed to protect 20-year-old Russian cabaret artist Oxana Rantseva from human trafficking and failed to conduct an effective investigation into the circumstances of her death in 2001."[2]


Prostitution is rife in Cyprus, and the island has been criticized for its role in the sex trade as one of the main routes of human trafficking from Eastern Europe.[28][29]

In May 2011, the UN Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights said that rejected asylum-seekers were kept for too long in detention and inconvenient conditions.[30] In May 2005, the KISA accused the police of violating the law and the human rights of asylum seekers by carrying out illegal arrests, detentions, and deportations.[8] Another non-governmental organization (NGO) reported in 2005 that the police deported long term residents, as long as 11 years.[8]

A large number of Romanian nationals were subjected to forced labor in the country in 2009.[31] In August 2009 the UNHCR complained through the media that a Kurdish child suffering from a terminal congenital condition was denied government funding to travel abroad for medical treatment because of his refugee status, in contravention of the country's refugee law, which provides refugees access to the same medical treatment as Cypriots and other EU citizens.[2] detention by occupying the water-tank tower of the prison in Nicosia and a hunger strike in Limassol.[32]

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
The Republic of Cyprus is a constitutional republic and multi-party presidential
democracy. In February voters elected President Nicos Anastasiades in free and
fair elections. In 2011 voters elected 56 representatives to the 80-seat House of
Representatives (Vouli Antiprosopon) in free and fair elections. Authorities
maintained effective control over the security forces. Security forces reportedly
committed some human rights abuses.
The most significant problems during the year remained trafficking in persons for
sexual exploitation and labor, police abuse and degrading treatment of persons in
custody and asylum seekers, and violence against women including spousal abuse.
Other problems during the year included prison overcrowding, some religious
groups lacked full access to and administration of religious sites, some cemeteries
and places of worship were reportedly inaccessible and neglected, incidents of
violence against children, and instances of discrimination and violence against
members of minority ethnic and national groups.
The government investigated and prosecuted corruption and abuse cases against
officials, but cases typically moved at a slow pace.


http://www.state.gov/documents/organization/220477.pdf

I must apologize for the American Source once again. Must be another American conspiracy.

The article refers mostly to women trafficking of eastern european women.
The average indigenous Cypriot women to whom I was refering are hardly mentioned. I have a very large family in Cyprus and know of no violence against them either at home or at work.

Check the figures for European nations, the UK etc and you will see which women suffer the most.
Im fed up with your fucking childish behaviour, so do me a favour Fuck off !"
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Re: Turk woman ordered to pay for abusive husband's swollen

Postby Paphitis » Mon Jan 11, 2016 6:51 pm

miltiades wrote:
Paphitis wrote:
Zenon33 wrote:
miltiades wrote:You were born in Australia, have visited Cyprus on a few occasions, have never interacted at length with the Cyprus way of life and you clearly make statements out of your arse.

I have never encountered a situation where violence against women is evident in any form. The Cypriot women are liberated, they are modern women who would not tolerate any form of violence against them, coupled with the fact that the Cypriots in general have a high regard for their mothers, grandmothers unties cousins etc,

You know fuck about Cyprus just as you know fuck all about anything else. But you do of course know a great deal about the wonderful admirable way of life in the....ME.
Plonker of Arabia suits you down to your ...arse.



I couldn't agree with you more.


Could it be because women are not empowered as much in Cyprus to be able to report abuse?

I think so ...

Women are more empowered in other countries.

But there you have it folks. Zenon couldn't agree more with Miltiades. 2 ignorant dingbats at their best!

Laws prohibit rape and spousal rape in the Republic of Cyprus. There has been a sharp increase in the number of these crimes in the 2000s.[2] Although sexual harassment in the workplace is prohibited, it is a widespread problem, but only few cases are reported to the authorities.[2]

In 1996, the UN Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination Against Women, Concluding Observations noted that women were not represented in political life much, they were absent from higher levels of the government, the trafficking of women and their sexual exploitation was against human rights, there was sexual harassment in the workplace, and women were not paid equal money for work of equal value.[18]

The committee also said:

"The Committee exhorts the Government to extend full social security coverage to self-employed rural women and to abolish existing discrimination in this respect between married and unmarried women. The Committee urges the Government to implement special sensitization and training programmes in gender issues for all law enforcement officials and judges, particularly judges in family courts. The Committee strongly recommends that urgent special temporary measures be adopted, under article 4 of the Convention, with the aim of substantially increasing the presence of women in all areas of public and political life, as well as actively promoting their position in the senior management of the civil service and in the diplomatic service. The Committee urges the Government to explore the proposal of non-governmental organizations to establish an equal opportunities commission to deal with complaints by women and to serve in a mediatory capacity."[18]

In 2006, the same committee expressed their concern about discrimination against women migrants, including domestic helpers and agricultural workers, lower number of women which have the PhD degree when compared with men, and "the lack of a comprehensive and systematic approach to gender equality policies".[19]

A US Department of State report in 2010 stated that:

"On January 7, the ECHR ruled in Rantsev v. Cyprus and Russia that Cyprus failed to protect 20-year-old Russian cabaret artist Oxana Rantseva from human trafficking and failed to conduct an effective investigation into the circumstances of her death in 2001."[2]


Prostitution is rife in Cyprus, and the island has been criticized for its role in the sex trade as one of the main routes of human trafficking from Eastern Europe.[28][29]

In May 2011, the UN Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights said that rejected asylum-seekers were kept for too long in detention and inconvenient conditions.[30] In May 2005, the KISA accused the police of violating the law and the human rights of asylum seekers by carrying out illegal arrests, detentions, and deportations.[8] Another non-governmental organization (NGO) reported in 2005 that the police deported long term residents, as long as 11 years.[8]

A large number of Romanian nationals were subjected to forced labor in the country in 2009.[31] In August 2009 the UNHCR complained through the media that a Kurdish child suffering from a terminal congenital condition was denied government funding to travel abroad for medical treatment because of his refugee status, in contravention of the country's refugee law, which provides refugees access to the same medical treatment as Cypriots and other EU citizens.[2] detention by occupying the water-tank tower of the prison in Nicosia and a hunger strike in Limassol.[32]

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
The Republic of Cyprus is a constitutional republic and multi-party presidential
democracy. In February voters elected President Nicos Anastasiades in free and
fair elections. In 2011 voters elected 56 representatives to the 80-seat House of
Representatives (Vouli Antiprosopon) in free and fair elections. Authorities
maintained effective control over the security forces. Security forces reportedly
committed some human rights abuses.
The most significant problems during the year remained trafficking in persons for
sexual exploitation and labor, police abuse and degrading treatment of persons in
custody and asylum seekers, and violence against women including spousal abuse.
Other problems during the year included prison overcrowding, some religious
groups lacked full access to and administration of religious sites, some cemeteries
and places of worship were reportedly inaccessible and neglected, incidents of
violence against children, and instances of discrimination and violence against
members of minority ethnic and national groups.
The government investigated and prosecuted corruption and abuse cases against
officials, but cases typically moved at a slow pace.


http://www.state.gov/documents/organization/220477.pdf

I must apologize for the American Source once again. Must be another American conspiracy.

The article refers mostly to women trafficking of eastern european women.
The average indigenous Cypriot women to whom I was refering are hardly mentioned. I have a very large family in Cyprus and know of no violence against them either at home or at work.

Check the figures for European nations, the UK etc and you will see which women suffer the most.
Im fed up with your fucking childish behaviour, so do me a favour Fuck off !"


It's mentioned alright:

Laws prohibit rape and spousal rape in the Republic of Cyprus. There has been a sharp increase in the number of these crimes in the 2000s.[2] Although sexual harassment in the workplace is prohibited, it is a widespread problem, but only few cases are reported to the authorities.[2]


Notice how they state that only few cases are reported. Which means there is a far greater problem and women are not empowered as much to report issues.

Also, if you have human trafficking in Cyprus, then that points out to a deeper issue of exploitation of women who are vulnerable.
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