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Turk woman ordered to pay for abusive husband's swollen hand

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Re: Turk woman ordered to pay for abusive husband's swollen

Postby Zenon33 » Mon Jan 11, 2016 10:04 pm

miltiades wrote:
Paphitis wrote:
Zenon33 wrote:
miltiades wrote:You were born in Australia, have visited Cyprus on a few occasions, have never interacted at length with the Cyprus way of life and you clearly make statements out of your arse.

I have never encountered a situation where violence against women is evident in any form. The Cypriot women are liberated, they are modern women who would not tolerate any form of violence against them, coupled with the fact that the Cypriots in general have a high regard for their mothers, grandmothers unties cousins etc,

You know fuck about Cyprus just as you know fuck all about anything else. But you do of course know a great deal about the wonderful admirable way of life in the....ME.
Plonker of Arabia suits you down to your ...arse.



I couldn't agree with you more.


Could it be because women are not empowered as much in Cyprus to be able to report abuse?

I think so ...

Women are more empowered in other countries.

But there you have it folks. Zenon couldn't agree more with Miltiades. 2 ignorant dingbats at their best!

Laws prohibit rape and spousal rape in the Republic of Cyprus. There has been a sharp increase in the number of these crimes in the 2000s.[2] Although sexual harassment in the workplace is prohibited, it is a widespread problem, but only few cases are reported to the authorities.[2]

In 1996, the UN Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination Against Women, Concluding Observations noted that women were not represented in political life much, they were absent from higher levels of the government, the trafficking of women and their sexual exploitation was against human rights, there was sexual harassment in the workplace, and women were not paid equal money for work of equal value.[18]

The committee also said:

"The Committee exhorts the Government to extend full social security coverage to self-employed rural women and to abolish existing discrimination in this respect between married and unmarried women. The Committee urges the Government to implement special sensitization and training programmes in gender issues for all law enforcement officials and judges, particularly judges in family courts. The Committee strongly recommends that urgent special temporary measures be adopted, under article 4 of the Convention, with the aim of substantially increasing the presence of women in all areas of public and political life, as well as actively promoting their position in the senior management of the civil service and in the diplomatic service. The Committee urges the Government to explore the proposal of non-governmental organizations to establish an equal opportunities commission to deal with complaints by women and to serve in a mediatory capacity."[18]

In 2006, the same committee expressed their concern about discrimination against women migrants, including domestic helpers and agricultural workers, lower number of women which have the PhD degree when compared with men, and "the lack of a comprehensive and systematic approach to gender equality policies".[19]

A US Department of State report in 2010 stated that:

"On January 7, the ECHR ruled in Rantsev v. Cyprus and Russia that Cyprus failed to protect 20-year-old Russian cabaret artist Oxana Rantseva from human trafficking and failed to conduct an effective investigation into the circumstances of her death in 2001."[2]


Prostitution is rife in Cyprus, and the island has been criticized for its role in the sex trade as one of the main routes of human trafficking from Eastern Europe.[28][29]

In May 2011, the UN Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights said that rejected asylum-seekers were kept for too long in detention and inconvenient conditions.[30] In May 2005, the KISA accused the police of violating the law and the human rights of asylum seekers by carrying out illegal arrests, detentions, and deportations.[8] Another non-governmental organization (NGO) reported in 2005 that the police deported long term residents, as long as 11 years.[8]

A large number of Romanian nationals were subjected to forced labor in the country in 2009.[31] In August 2009 the UNHCR complained through the media that a Kurdish child suffering from a terminal congenital condition was denied government funding to travel abroad for medical treatment because of his refugee status, in contravention of the country's refugee law, which provides refugees access to the same medical treatment as Cypriots and other EU citizens.[2] detention by occupying the water-tank tower of the prison in Nicosia and a hunger strike in Limassol.[32]

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
The Republic of Cyprus is a constitutional republic and multi-party presidential
democracy. In February voters elected President Nicos Anastasiades in free and
fair elections. In 2011 voters elected 56 representatives to the 80-seat House of
Representatives (Vouli Antiprosopon) in free and fair elections. Authorities
maintained effective control over the security forces. Security forces reportedly
committed some human rights abuses.
The most significant problems during the year remained trafficking in persons for
sexual exploitation and labor, police abuse and degrading treatment of persons in
custody and asylum seekers, and violence against women including spousal abuse.
Other problems during the year included prison overcrowding, some religious
groups lacked full access to and administration of religious sites, some cemeteries
and places of worship were reportedly inaccessible and neglected, incidents of
violence against children, and instances of discrimination and violence against
members of minority ethnic and national groups.
The government investigated and prosecuted corruption and abuse cases against
officials, but cases typically moved at a slow pace.


http://www.state.gov/documents/organization/220477.pdf

I must apologize for the American Source once again. Must be another American conspiracy.

The article refers mostly to women trafficking of eastern european women.
The average indigenous Cypriot women to whom I was refering are hardly mentioned. I have a very large family in Cyprus and know of no violence against them either at home or at work.

Check the figures for European nations, the UK etc and you will see which women suffer the most.
Im fed up with your fucking childish behaviour, so do me a favour Fuck off !"



American, British, Swedish, danish women suffer the most. Domestic violence and rape in those countries are a serious problem.
But their women are more "empowered".
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Re: Turk woman ordered to pay for abusive husband's swollen

Postby Zenon33 » Tue Jan 12, 2016 12:25 pm

"countries like Cyprus which still to this day has a culture in condoning domestic violence and blaming the victim".


One in five australians believe a woman is responsible for rape :

The poll of 17,500 people also found one in six people support the notion that when women say no to sex, they mean yes.
VicHealth chief executive Jerril Rechter said the results were "shocking" and showed there was still a lot of work to do when it came to changing people's attitudes.
"These are terrible statistics and whilst we're making headway in some areas, we are seriously concerned that many people have attitudes that lead to the potential for violence against women," she said.
The survey found that most people believe violence is caused by men being unable to control their anger and their need for sex.
"What we do know is that violence is a choice. It's not an instinct," she said.
"It is never acceptable and no woman ever invites it or deserves it."
Ms Rechter said the findings also revealed the extent of the work that needed to be done to wipe out the "common and preventable" problem of violence against women.
"What we're seeing is that Australian attitudes towards violence against women are pretty much staying the same," she said.
Ms Rechter said headway was being made in some areas.
For instance people now understand violence includes emotional and social abuse.
She said people needed to understand that making a sexist joke at work or at a sports club was "inexcusable and unacceptable in Australia today".
"Whilst it might be difficult to understand that a sexist comment or joke can led to violence against women, what it does do is it lays the groundwork for people's attitudes to women to be poor and this is the behaviour that needs to change," she said.
Her views are echoed by survivors of sexual assault and family violence.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-09-17/o ... pe/5749088






Australia’s sexual assault shame: One in six women a victim, putting Australia way above world average

AUSTRALIAN women are being sexually assaulted at twice the rate of women worldwide.

Despite our greater gender equality, we rank third after the war-torn Congo and the southern African nations of Namibia, South Africa and Zimbabwe for rates of sexual assault against women.

One in six Australian women have been the victim of a sexual assault by a non-partner, compared to one in 14 women around the world, a new study shows.

When sexual assaults by partners are included more than one in five — or 2.3 million —

http://www.news.com.au/national/austral ... 6825094300




Yes, Australia is a good country for women......
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Zenon33
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Posts: 616
Joined: Mon Jul 06, 2015 3:49 pm
Location: Limassol, Cyprus

Re: Turk woman ordered to pay for abusive husband's swollen

Postby Paphitis » Tue Jan 12, 2016 12:47 pm

Zenon33 wrote:
miltiades wrote:
Paphitis wrote:
Zenon33 wrote:
miltiades wrote:You were born in Australia, have visited Cyprus on a few occasions, have never interacted at length with the Cyprus way of life and you clearly make statements out of your arse.

I have never encountered a situation where violence against women is evident in any form. The Cypriot women are liberated, they are modern women who would not tolerate any form of violence against them, coupled with the fact that the Cypriots in general have a high regard for their mothers, grandmothers unties cousins etc,

You know fuck about Cyprus just as you know fuck all about anything else. But you do of course know a great deal about the wonderful admirable way of life in the....ME.
Plonker of Arabia suits you down to your ...arse.



I couldn't agree with you more.


Could it be because women are not empowered as much in Cyprus to be able to report abuse?

I think so ...

Women are more empowered in other countries.

But there you have it folks. Zenon couldn't agree more with Miltiades. 2 ignorant dingbats at their best!

Laws prohibit rape and spousal rape in the Republic of Cyprus. There has been a sharp increase in the number of these crimes in the 2000s.[2] Although sexual harassment in the workplace is prohibited, it is a widespread problem, but only few cases are reported to the authorities.[2]

In 1996, the UN Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination Against Women, Concluding Observations noted that women were not represented in political life much, they were absent from higher levels of the government, the trafficking of women and their sexual exploitation was against human rights, there was sexual harassment in the workplace, and women were not paid equal money for work of equal value.[18]

The committee also said:

"The Committee exhorts the Government to extend full social security coverage to self-employed rural women and to abolish existing discrimination in this respect between married and unmarried women. The Committee urges the Government to implement special sensitization and training programmes in gender issues for all law enforcement officials and judges, particularly judges in family courts. The Committee strongly recommends that urgent special temporary measures be adopted, under article 4 of the Convention, with the aim of substantially increasing the presence of women in all areas of public and political life, as well as actively promoting their position in the senior management of the civil service and in the diplomatic service. The Committee urges the Government to explore the proposal of non-governmental organizations to establish an equal opportunities commission to deal with complaints by women and to serve in a mediatory capacity."[18]

In 2006, the same committee expressed their concern about discrimination against women migrants, including domestic helpers and agricultural workers, lower number of women which have the PhD degree when compared with men, and "the lack of a comprehensive and systematic approach to gender equality policies".[19]

A US Department of State report in 2010 stated that:

"On January 7, the ECHR ruled in Rantsev v. Cyprus and Russia that Cyprus failed to protect 20-year-old Russian cabaret artist Oxana Rantseva from human trafficking and failed to conduct an effective investigation into the circumstances of her death in 2001."[2]


Prostitution is rife in Cyprus, and the island has been criticized for its role in the sex trade as one of the main routes of human trafficking from Eastern Europe.[28][29]

In May 2011, the UN Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights said that rejected asylum-seekers were kept for too long in detention and inconvenient conditions.[30] In May 2005, the KISA accused the police of violating the law and the human rights of asylum seekers by carrying out illegal arrests, detentions, and deportations.[8] Another non-governmental organization (NGO) reported in 2005 that the police deported long term residents, as long as 11 years.[8]

A large number of Romanian nationals were subjected to forced labor in the country in 2009.[31] In August 2009 the UNHCR complained through the media that a Kurdish child suffering from a terminal congenital condition was denied government funding to travel abroad for medical treatment because of his refugee status, in contravention of the country's refugee law, which provides refugees access to the same medical treatment as Cypriots and other EU citizens.[2] detention by occupying the water-tank tower of the prison in Nicosia and a hunger strike in Limassol.[32]

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
The Republic of Cyprus is a constitutional republic and multi-party presidential
democracy. In February voters elected President Nicos Anastasiades in free and
fair elections. In 2011 voters elected 56 representatives to the 80-seat House of
Representatives (Vouli Antiprosopon) in free and fair elections. Authorities
maintained effective control over the security forces. Security forces reportedly
committed some human rights abuses.
The most significant problems during the year remained trafficking in persons for
sexual exploitation and labor, police abuse and degrading treatment of persons in
custody and asylum seekers, and violence against women including spousal abuse.
Other problems during the year included prison overcrowding, some religious
groups lacked full access to and administration of religious sites, some cemeteries
and places of worship were reportedly inaccessible and neglected, incidents of
violence against children, and instances of discrimination and violence against
members of minority ethnic and national groups.
The government investigated and prosecuted corruption and abuse cases against
officials, but cases typically moved at a slow pace.


http://www.state.gov/documents/organization/220477.pdf

I must apologize for the American Source once again. Must be another American conspiracy.

The article refers mostly to women trafficking of eastern european women.
The average indigenous Cypriot women to whom I was refering are hardly mentioned. I have a very large family in Cyprus and know of no violence against them either at home or at work.

Check the figures for European nations, the UK etc and you will see which women suffer the most.
Im fed up with your fucking childish behaviour, so do me a favour Fuck off !"



American, British, Swedish, danish women suffer the most. Domestic violence and rape in those countries are a serious problem.
But their women are more "empowered".


No American, British and Danish Women do not suffer more. They don't suffer more because there is no honour culture and because they provide better awareness, protection, counselling and law enforcement.

They don't suffer more because women are liberated a lot more in those countries than they are in Cyprus. This means that women who fall victim are better able to go to the authorities and report their issues. There is also no human trafficking of Eastern Women sex workers because they would get their arses busted by immigration, whereas in Cyprus anything goes.

They don't suffer more in Australia either because in Australia they hold polls and investigations like the one below to see the head-space of the general public which btw is a lot more extremely diverse than Cyprus with various cultures and backgrounds including the honor based cultures of Islam, Greek, Italian, Cypriot and Turkish etc.

Oh yes, Cyprus is a lot closer in this regard to Islamic Countries like Turkey that it can ever be to Britain, Denmark, Sweden or Australia. Sorry to burst your bubble, but it had to be done.

Oh and yes, the US State Department, does not mentioned us either like some countries are - Cyprus and Turkey are mentioned but I guess you will think that is a conspiracy.

You show me a poll like that about Cyprus. That just goes to show how far behind you are.
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