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Whaaaaaaahhh!!! Oh whoa is me. I tell u I'm Cypriot!

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Who is the greatest poster ever and which one of us should stay?


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Me - Erolz33
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Me too - Erolz66
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Me me me- Erolz99
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Total votes : 0

Whaaaaaaahhh!!! Oh whoa is me. I tell u I'm Cypriot!

Postby GreekIslandGirl » Fri Feb 05, 2016 12:37 am

Please tell me you love me more than you love anyone else. :)

Please beg me to stay and post anti-Greek stuff disguised as pro-Cypriot stuff.

She's being mean to me again! Waah! :(

I'm such a nice guy, please vote for me! :)
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Re: Whaaaaaaahhh!!! Oh whoa is me. I tell u I'm Cypriot!

Postby supporttheunderdog » Fri Feb 05, 2016 7:19 am

This is one if the most trollish purile and pathetic posts I have seen, a new low from you, with the possible exception of Gavy baby persistently trolling Milti... Little Star, "g"IGgle girl, I think this shows you have lost it, both the plot and the argument about Schengen.
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Re: Whaaaaaaahhh!!! Oh whoa is me. I tell u I'm Cypriot!

Postby GreekIslandGirl » Fri Feb 05, 2016 10:51 am

The trollish posters are you and Erolz who systematically derail any of my threads containing the tiniest bit of positive news on Greece or Cyprus or the people. You persist with irrelevancies or matters I have already dealt with to post and repost whatever bad news you can find, regardless of worth or truth.

As for Schengen, you'd better check out the complete U-turn your co-bandit is now trying to establish. :lol:

Erolz has been particularly childish running for support every time he has been shown his weaknesses in evaluating evidence.

I'm sure he can start another poll asking everyone to pat him on the back for continuing to post here so 'bravely' - we should feel so 'honoured'.
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Re: Whaaaaaaahhh!!! Oh whoa is me. I tell u I'm Cypriot!

Postby GreekIslandGirl » Fri Feb 05, 2016 11:25 am

It's as if our Nobel Laureate Sir Christopher Antoniou Pissarides has seen erolz's and STUD's attempts at derailing anything to do with the small recognition the Greek islanders are receiving in being considered for the Nobel Peace Prize. This type of behaviour exemplified by erolz66 and his co-saboteur is replicated in the worst of the anti-Greek media.

Anti-Greek propaganda on CF under the orchestration of erolz66. As soon as I post any news on the Nobel Peace Prize he jumps in with some "Schengen sanctions" pseudo-news (straight from the EU Commission no less, the shameless liar) or some months old "opinions" on how badly Greece patrols its "borders" or how awful it is with its "obligations"

The voice of reason wrote:"Innocent people are desperately seeking a way out of the hell of Syria to restart their lives, children are drowning in our seas and our political leaders are watching and still arguing about numbers, about fences, about registration documents and passports, about Dublin and Schengen." Nobel Laureate Sir Christopher Antoniou Pissarides


http://www.thenewsminute.com/article/on ... VYVni.dpuf
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Re: Whaaaaaaahhh!!! Oh whoa is me. I tell u I'm Cypriot!

Postby supporttheunderdog » Fri Feb 05, 2016 1:13 pm

Here are links to the Official EU press release news site
http://europa.eu/rapid/press-release_IP-16-211_en.htm
http://europa.eu/rapid/press-release_IP-16-211_en.htm

Here is the text of the news items they published,
European Commission - Press release
Commission discusses draft Schengen Evaluation Report on Greece

Brussels, 27 January 2016

Commission discusses draft Schengen Evaluation Report on Greece

The College of Commissioners has today, in view of the findings and their significance, taken note and discussed a draft Schengen Evaluation Report on Greece. The Schengen evaluation mechanism, established in October 2013, provides for the verification of the application of the Schengen rules through monitoring visits to a given Member State by Commission-led teams with experts from Member States and Frontex. The draft Schengen evaluation report for Greece, drawn up jointly by Member States experts and Commission representatives, will now be sent to the Schengen Evaluation Committee which will give its opinion. The report will then be adopted by the Commission by means of an implementing act.
Migration and Home Affairs Commissioner Dimitris Avramopoulos said: "If we want to maintain our internal area of free movement, we must better manage our external borders. This means that we will only save Schengen by applying Schengen. The Commission continuously monitors the implementation of the Schengen rules in all Schengen Member States. The draft Schengen evaluation report on Greece looks at the management of the external border during an evaluation visit of Member States and Commission experts in Greece in November. The report shows that there are serious deficiencies in the management of the external border in Greece. We know that in the meantime Greece has started undertaking efforts towards rectifying and complying with the Schengen rules. Substantial improvements are needed to ensure the proper reception, registration, relocation or return of migrants in order to bring Schengen functioning back to normal, without internal border controls. This is our ultimate common goal."
The draft report – which is not public – is based on unannounced site visits to the Greek-Turkish land border and to Chios and Samos conducted from 10 to 13 November 2015. The report looks at the presence of police and coast guard personnel on the inspected sites, the efficiency of the identification and registration process, sea border surveillance and cooperation with neighbouring countries. Whilst acknowledging that the Greek authorities are under pressure, the report notably finds that there is no effective identification and registration of irregular migrants and that fingerprints are not being systematically entered into the system and travel documents are not being systematically checked for the authenticity or against crucial security databases, such as SIS, Interpol and national databases. On this basis, the draft report concludes that Greece is seriously neglecting its obligations and that there are serious deficiencies in the carrying out of external border controls that must be overcome and dealt with by the Greek authorities.
Schengen Evaluation Mechanism
Schengen evaluations are carried out in Member States based on a multi-annual and an annual evaluation programme. Such visits can be announced or unannounced.
Following each visit, a report is drawn up identifying any shortcomings and making recommendations for remedial action, with a deadline for their implementation. The recommendations are submitted by the Commission to the Council for adoption. As a follow-up, the Member State in question is required to submit an action plan setting out how it intends to remedy the weaknesses identified. Member States can be assisted in fulfilling the recommendations via practical and/or financial measures from the Commission, Frontex or other EU bodies.
The Eighth bi-annual report on the functioning of the Schengen area of 15 December 2015 already announced that, depending on the results of the Schengen evaluations in Greece, specific measures as referred to in Article 19a and 26 of the Schengen Borders Code may be recommended.
Procedures addressing exceptional circumstances
If a Schengen Evaluation Report concludes that the evaluated Member State is "seriously neglecting its obligations under the Schengen rules" and if there are "serious deficiencies in the carrying out of external border control", the Commission can propose recommendations, to be adopted by the Council, for remedial action to address any deficiencies identified during the evaluation. In order to ensure compliance with these recommendations, the Commission may, under Article 19a of the Schengen Borders Code, recommend that the evaluated Member State take certain specific measures, which may include the deployment of European border guard teams or the submission of a strategic plan setting out how the Member State will deploy its own personnel and equipment to address the concerns. The Commission's proposals must be adopted by a Committee of the Member States, acting by qualified majority. The evaluated Member State then has three months to complete the remedial actions.
Where, after three months, serious deficiencies persist and the measures taken have not proved sufficient to ensure the adequate remedy of these deficiencies, the Commission may trigger the application of the procedure provided for in Article 26 of the Schengen Borders Code.
Under Article 26 of the Schengen Borders Code, if the measures under Article 19a have not been effective, the Council may, based on a proposal from Commission, recommend that one or more Member States reintroduce border controls at all or at specific parts of their internal borders as a matter of last resort, to protect the common interest of the Schengen area. The Council recommendation needs to be adopted by qualified majority.
Under Article 26, and in the exceptional circumstances described above, controls can be reintroduced for a period of up to six months. This measure can be prolonged for additional six month periods up to a maximum duration of two years.



European Commission - Press release
Commission adopts Schengen Evaluation Report on Greece and proposes recommendations to address deficiencies in external border management

Strasbourg, 2 February 2016

Commission adopts Schengen Evaluation Report on Greece and proposes recommendations to address deficiencies in external border management

Following a positive opinion by the Schengen evaluation committee on Friday, the College of Commissioners has today adopted the Schengen Evaluation Report on Greece and a proposal for a Council Recommendation on addressing the serious deficiencies identified in the evaluation report on the application of Schengen rules in the field of management of the external borders by Greece. The recommendations will be submitted to the Council for adoption.
The Schengen evaluation mechanism, established in October 2013, provides for the verification of the application of the Schengen rules through monitoring visits to a given Member State by Commission-led teams with experts from Member States and Frontex. The Schengen evaluation report for Greece and the Proposal for a Council Recommendation has been drawn up jointly by Member States experts and Commission representatives.
Migration, Home Affairs and Citizenship Commissioner Dimitris Avramopoulos said: "Our ability to maintain an area free of internal border controls depends on our ability to effectively manage our external borders. Today we are proposing a set of recommendations to ensure that, at all external borders of Greece, controls are carried out and brought in line with Schengen rules. At the same time, we take note of the efforts of the Greek Authorities to improve the situation and are reminding that all parts of the Commission's comprehensive plan need to be applied to face the unprecedented pressure at Europe's external borders. The objective of the European Commission and of the Member States is to safeguard and strengthen Schengen. We will only save Schengen by applying Schengen."
The recommendations seek to ensure that Greece applies all Schengen rules related to management of external border correctly and effectively. Recommendations are made in a number of areas such as the improvement of the registration procedures, including ensuring a sufficient number of staff and fingerprint scanners for registration and verification of migrants and their travel documents against SIS, Interpol and national databases. Greece should provide the necessary facilities for accommodation during the registration process and launch return procedures for irregular migrants who are not seeking asylum and who are not in need of international protection. Border surveillance should be improved, including the establishment of a risk analysis system and increased training of border guards. Improvements should also be made to infrastructure and equipment at the border crossing points.
In order to ensure compliance with these recommendations, the Commission may, in addition, recommend that Greece takes certain specific measures under Article 19a of the Schengen Borders Code, given the serious deficiencies noted in the Schengen Evaluation Report.
Schengen Evaluation Mechanism
Schengen evaluations are carried out in Member States based on a multi-annual and an annual evaluation programme. Such visits can be announced or unannounced.
Following each visit, a report is drawn up identifying any shortcomings and this is accompanied by recommendations for remedial action, with a deadline for their implementation. The recommendations are submitted by the Commission to the Council for adoption. As a follow-up, the Member State in question is required to submit an action plan setting out how it intends to remedy the weaknesses identified. Member States can be assisted in fulfilling the recommendations via practical and/or financial measures from the Commission, Frontex or other EU bodies.
The Eighth bi-annual report on the functioning of the Schengen area of 15 December 2015 already announced that, depending on the results of the Schengen evaluations in Greece, specific measures as referred to in Article 19a and 26 of the Schengen Borders Code may be recommended.
Procedures addressing exceptional circumstances
If a Schengen Evaluation Report concludes that the evaluated Member State is "seriously neglecting its obligations under the Schengen rules" and if there are "serious deficiencies in the carrying out of external border control", the Commission can propose recommendations, to be adopted by the Council, for remedial action to address any deficiencies identified during the evaluation. In order to ensure compliance with these recommendations, the Commission may, under Article 19a of the Schengen Borders Code, recommend that the evaluated Member State take certain specific measures, which may include the deployment of European border guard teams or the submission of a strategic plan setting out how the Member State will deploy its own personnel and equipment to address the concerns. The Commission's proposals must be adopted by a Committee of the Member States, acting by qualified majority. The evaluated Member State then has three months to complete the remedial actions.
Where, after three months from the adoption of the Council recommendations, serious deficiencies persist and the measures taken have not proved sufficient to ensure the adequate remedy of these deficiencies, the Commission may trigger the application of the procedure provided for in Article 26 of the Schengen Borders Code.
Under Article 26 of the Schengen Borders Code, if the measures under Article 19a have not been effective, the Council may, based on a proposal from Commission, recommend that one or more Member States reintroduce border controls at all or at specific parts of their internal borders as a matter of last resort, to protect the common interest of the Schengen area. The Council recommendation needs to be adopted by qualified majority.
Under Article 26, and in the exceptional circumstances described above, controls can be reintroduced for a period of up to six months. This measure can be prolonged for additional six month periods up to a maximum duration of two years.


It is clear from these OFFICIAL EU PRESS RELEASES that Greece is not adequately performing
effective identification and registration of irregular migrants and that fingerprints are not being systematically entered into the system and travel documents are not being systematically checked for the authenticity or against crucial security databases, such as SIS, Interpol and national databases.
and as such
that Greece is seriously neglecting its obligations and that there are serious deficiencies in the carrying out of external border controls that must be overcome and dealt with by the Greek authorities.


The second OFFICIAL EU PRESS REPORT States
Following a positive opinion by the Schengen evaluation committee on Friday, the College of Commissioners has today adopted the Schengen Evaluation Report on Greece and a proposal for a Council Recommendation on addressing the serious deficiencies identified in the evaluation report on the application of Schengen rules in the field of management of the external borders by Greece. The recommendations will be submitted to the Council for adoption.
The Schengen evaluation mechanism, established in October 2013, provides for the verification of the application of the Schengen rules through monitoring visits to a given Member State by Commission-led teams with experts from Member States and Frontex. The Schengen evaluation report for Greece and the Proposal for a Council Recommendation has been drawn up jointly by Member States experts and Commission representatives.
Migration, Home Affairs and Citizenship Commissioner Dimitris Avramopoulos said: "Our ability to maintain an area free of internal border controls depends on our ability to effectively manage our external borders. Today we are proposing a set of recommendations to ensure that, at all external borders of Greece, controls are carried out and brought in line with Schengen rules.


The press reports then both set out that that if necessary
Where, after three months from the adoption of the Council recommendations, serious deficiencies persist and the measures taken have not proved sufficient to ensure the adequate remedy of these deficiencies, the Commission may trigger the application of the procedure provided for in Article 26 of the Schengen Borders Code.
Under Article 26 of the Schengen Borders Code, if the measures under Article 19a have not been effective, the Council may, based on a proposal from Commission, recommend that one or more Member States reintroduce border controls at all or at specific parts of their internal borders as a matter of last resort, to protect the common interest of the Schengen area.


Now who is lying? I think you are and all you are reduced to is repeating the lie that Erolz is lying.
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Re: Whaaaaaaahhh!!! Oh whoa is me. I tell u I'm Cypriot!

Postby GreekIslandGirl » Fri Feb 05, 2016 1:25 pm

It doesn't matter you frogging idiot! It's meaningless paperwork!

They can't do anything but help Greece with more Frontex if Greece is struggling with migrants.

The only one failing on obligations is the EU and its "Agencies".

It stops here! Greece is already isolated without common Schengen borders. Idiot!
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Re: Whaaaaaaahhh!!! Oh whoa is me. I tell u I'm Cypriot!

Postby supporttheunderdog » Fri Feb 05, 2016 2:28 pm

GreekIslandGirl wrote:It doesn't matter you frogging idiot! It's meaningless paperwork!

They can't do anything but help Greece with more Frontex if Greece is struggling with migrants.

The only one failing on obligations is the EU and its "Agencies".

It stops here! Greece is already isolated without common Schengen borders. Idiot!


but how about the many millions who travel from Schengen states via air or by sea, eg from Italy, who might have to go through passport control to fly or sail to or from Greece?

Interesting how you otherwise dismiss EU official papers as meaningless paperwork. I suggest you otherwise look at the link I posted elsewhere on the EU border code which clealy delineates who is responsible for what, where external border control is primarily for the nations to control and which it is why the Reports state it is Greece that is in serious violation. And no, black is not white no matter how much you argue otherwise.
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Re: Whaaaaaaahhh!!! Oh whoa is me. I tell u I'm Cypriot!

Postby DrCyprus » Fri Feb 05, 2016 4:25 pm

How can this demented Frau Gig represent anything Cypriot ever. She is Scottish.
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Re: Whaaaaaaahhh!!! Oh whoa is me. I tell u I'm Cypriot!

Postby GreekIslandGirl » Fri Feb 05, 2016 5:22 pm

Oh, do we only have to 'represent' something Cypriot?

:roll:

Sorry we can't all be as superficial as you and erolz. Then we'd all be 'representative'.

I guess erolz represents the Turkish Occupation of Cyprus!
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Re: Whaaaaaaahhh!!! Oh whoa is me. I tell u I'm Cypriot!

Postby Pyrpolizer » Fri Feb 05, 2016 11:41 pm

supporttheunderdog wrote:
GreekIslandGirl wrote:It doesn't matter you frogging idiot! It's meaningless paperwork!

They can't do anything but help Greece with more Frontex if Greece is struggling with migrants.

The only one failing on obligations is the EU and its "Agencies".

It stops here! Greece is already isolated without common Schengen borders. Idiot!


but how about the many millions who travel from Schengen states via air or by sea, eg from Italy, who might have to go through passport control to fly or sail to or from Greece?

Interesting how you otherwise dismiss EU official papers as meaningless paperwork. I suggest you otherwise look at the link I posted elsewhere on the EU border code which clealy delineates who is responsible for what, where external border control is primarily for the nations to control and which it is why the Reports state it is Greece that is in serious violation. And no, black is not white no matter how much you argue otherwise.


IMO the HUMAN RIGHTS of those refugees super exceed and rank No1 in priority over any formalities required by Schengen.
The mere fact that they try to stigmatize Greece for not "performing very well" in trying to hide their true intentions (of actually not wanting the refugees) and caring less for their human rights is just a hypocritical behavior from the EU itself.
Unfortunately you and Erolz used this argument so many times in these discussions that looks like you take it for granted that it is right.
It CANNOT stand as an argument unless you subscribe to EU's hypocritical behavior.
Well, DO YOU?
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