The Best Cyprus Community

Skip to content


Train Crash?

Benefits and problems from the EU membership.

Train Crash?

Postby paaul12 » Tue Nov 28, 2006 1:22 pm

EU’s Rehn sees tension ahead with Turkey

‘European Commission is working to avoid a train crash at the end of the year’

RELATIONS BETWEEN the European Union and Turkey face turbulence later this year over Cyprus and it will take deft diplomacy to avoid a "train crash", EU Enlargement Commissioner Olli Rehn said yesterday. (Wednesday, March 29, 2006)


From the above statement we can assume if Turkey refuses to open its ports there will be a train crash, according to Rehn, a train crash should convey to the reader something very serious will happen, in fact nothing short of a disaster, I think we can all agree on that point!

So what does Rehn mean by “train Crash” well in today’s Cyprus Mail he explains exactly what this “train crash” actually means:

EU Enlargement commissioner Olli Rehn said yesterday negotiations would not be stopped or frozen, but would continue more slowly. “A solution has to be found," Rehn said. "The Commission thinks negotiations cannot be completely stopped. The train will slow down, but not stop. This is not a business as usual situation." Tuesday, November 28, 2006.


So there you have it:

Train Crash = The train will Slow down.

Well done the EU again I guess it must be a translation thing it must be great being a politician number one quality requirement, the ability to tell “good Lies”
User avatar
paaul12
Contributor
Contributor
 
Posts: 473
Joined: Sun Feb 12, 2006 6:57 pm

Postby zan » Thu Nov 30, 2006 12:28 am

REUTERS REPORT

17:05 29Nov2006
ANALYSIS-Strategy, politics collide in EU Turkey battle

By Paul Taylor, European Affairs Editor
RIGA, Nov 29 (Reuters) - Strategic interests and political realities will collide over the next two weeks as the European Union battles to decide how hard to punish Turkey for its failure to open its ports to ships from Cyprus.
The executive European Commission fired the starting gun on Wednesday with an unexpectedly tough recommendation that the EU suspend a sizeable chunk of Ankara's membership negotiations.
Turkish Prime Minister Tayyip Erdogan was quoted as branding the decision "unacceptable" and Britain, Ankara's biggest ally in the 25-nation bloc, called it "disappointingly tough".
Having spent much of the year warning of a potential "train crash" in Turkey's EU bid, European Enlargement Commissioner Olli Rehn insisted his recommendation would not cause one since talks would continue at a slower pace.
Swedish Foreign Minister Carl Bildt told reporters the Commission was "probably putting the brakes on too hard.
"Were there to be a stop in the process, it would be a strategic calamity of the first order," Bildt said.
Rehn proposed freezing eight of the 35 policy areas or "chapters" into which negotiations are divided and refusing to conclude any chapter until the Cyprus dispute is resolved.
But for those most sceptical of Turkey's EU aspirations, such as Austria and Luxembourg, that may not be tough enough. An EU source said some countries wanted as much as half of the negotiations to be put on indefinite hold.
Cyprus is anyway blocking the opening of any new chapters, so the outcome could be that negotiations are partially frozen in theory and at a complete standstill in practice.

LOSING TURKEY?
All 25 EU leaders agreed unanimously in December 2004 to open accession talks with the vast, populous, poor and overwhelmingly Muslim country, regarded as a strategically vital bridge with the Middle East and the Islamic world.
But public opinion has turned against Turkey in western Europe and against the EU in Turkey in a process of mutual estrangement that has led Brussels think-tanks to stage conferences entitled "Are we losing Turkey?"
The United States, which has also seen its relations with Ankara plummet over the war in Iraq, is now anxious at the prospect of Europe turning its back on a crucial NATO ally because of the peripheral issue of Cyprus, diplomats say.
"You simply cannot overestimate the strategic importance of Turkey," former U.S. ambassador to the United Nations Richard Holbrooke told a Brussels conference this month.
Many diplomats say the EU made a huge political mistake when it agreed to admit a divided Cyprus in 2004, represented only by the Greek Cypriot goverment in Nicosia, after the Greek Cypriots rejected a U.N. peace plan accepted by the Turkish Cypriots.
"Letting a divided Cyprus in was the original sin. We are paying for it now and we will continue to pay for it," one EU ambassador said, speaking on condition of anonymity.
Cyprus has used its seat at the EU table, where all decisions on enlargement require unanimity, to obstruct Turkey's path at every turn to press its own interests.
Former Cypriot Foreign Minister George Iacovou boasted in June after holding up Turkey's first negotiating chapter for days that since unanimity was needed to open and close each of the 35 chapters, his country had 70 leverage points.
Diplomats say the bloc's tradition of trying to accommodate a member state on a matter of vital national interest, coupled with Greek tactical support to save Nicosia from isolation, meant the EU was a permanent hostage to the Cyprus problem.
That has infuriated Turkey's political establishment, which has showed rare unanimity in rejecting the EU's conditions.
Recent elections and referendums in Austria, France and the Netherlands have shown that opposing Turkey is a vote winner.
But the political reality in Turkey is that with a general election due by next November, there is no political mileage in making concessions to an ungrateful EU over Cyprus.
Nevertheless, Turkish officials seemed genuinely shocked by Wednesday's Commission recommendation.
Turkish sources said they had expected Brussels to propose freezing just three or four chapters, rather than eight. They were also stunned by the provision that the EU conclude no new "chapter" until the Cyprus trade dispute is settled.
"The suspension will definitely create more anti-European feeling here in Turkey," said analyst Huseyin Bagci of the Middle East Technical University in Ankara.
Unless the EU manages to reverse the negative dynamic in the relationship between Brussels and Ankara, next year's think-tank conferences may be entitled "Who lost Turkey?"
(Additional reporting by David Brunnstrom in Brussels and Emma Ross-Thomas in Istanbul)
((Editing by Patrick Worsnip; Reuters Messaging: paul.taylor.reuters.com@reuters.net; +322 2876801))
Keywords: EU TURKEY/BATTLE
Wednesday, 29 November 2006 17:05:32RTRS [nL29220986] {C}ENDS
User avatar
zan
Leading Contributor
Leading Contributor
 
Posts: 16213
Joined: Wed Nov 02, 2005 8:55 pm

Postby Piratis » Thu Nov 30, 2006 8:19 pm

Train Crash = The train will Slow down.


Do you still dream about EU? What is for sure is that this train will never arrive in Europe.

Zan, the only ones in EU who want Turkey in EU are the British. The rest are either indifferent or are opposed. If Cyprus was not an EU member, Greece would do what is needed.
User avatar
Piratis
Moderator
Moderator
 
Posts: 12261
Joined: Tue Mar 09, 2004 11:08 pm

Postby zan » Fri Dec 01, 2006 12:01 am

Piratis wrote:
Train Crash = The train will Slow down.


Do you still dream about EU? What is for sure is that this train will never arrive in Europe.

Zan, the only ones in EU who want Turkey in EU are the British. The rest are either indifferent or are opposed. If Cyprus was not an EU member, Greece would do what is needed.



The only ones that wanted or thought Greece was ready for membership into the EU was America and that worked. All of Europe could not say no to America, what makes you think that little old RoC will make the difference?????????
User avatar
zan
Leading Contributor
Leading Contributor
 
Posts: 16213
Joined: Wed Nov 02, 2005 8:55 pm

Postby pitsilos » Fri Dec 01, 2006 12:53 am

different times zan, the ecc is nothing comparing to the eu. they have laws, and these laws can't be changed to accomodate turkey, i am afraid. she either plays by the rules, slow pace, or while not in the position, walk away.

are you asking the us to force the eu to bend their rules just to accomodate turkey? how would that look? it doesn't make sence.

ps. you gotta stop mentioning greece with every post. :lol: its coming accross as border insanity :lol:
pitsilos
Regular Contributor
Regular Contributor
 
Posts: 1846
Joined: Sat Oct 21, 2006 11:04 am

Postby zan » Fri Dec 01, 2006 1:11 am

pitsilos wrote:different times zan, the ecc is nothing comparing to the eu. they have laws, and these laws can't be changed to accomodate turkey, i am afraid. she either plays by the rules, slow pace, or while not in the position, walk away.

are you asking the us to force the eu to bend their rules just to accomodate turkey? how would that look? it doesn't make sence.

ps. you gotta stop mentioning greece with every post. :lol: its coming accross as border insanity :lol:


OK we will see but I think border insanity is at the green line and does not go in your sentence....ho hum.....

Talking about insanity, the grinning faces in every one of your posts.............................................ha....haha.....hahaha
User avatar
zan
Leading Contributor
Leading Contributor
 
Posts: 16213
Joined: Wed Nov 02, 2005 8:55 pm

Postby pitsilos » Fri Dec 01, 2006 1:35 am

nope, border line insanity is locked in your head with your obsession with greece. its you that spams the forum about greece on just about every post.

i don't know if you didn't get it we are CYPRIOTS. greece, turkey, france, germany, has no interest to me. what i am interested, unlike you, is getting turkey out of our homeland so an agreement can be reached.
pitsilos
Regular Contributor
Regular Contributor
 
Posts: 1846
Joined: Sat Oct 21, 2006 11:04 am

Postby zan » Fri Dec 01, 2006 9:53 am

pitsilos wrote:nope, border line insanity is locked in your head with your obsession with greece. its you that spams the forum about greece on just about every post.

i don't know if you didn't get it we are CYPRIOTS. greece, turkey, france, germany, has no interest to me. what i am interested, unlike you, is getting turkey out of our homeland so an agreement can be reached.



Why use Turkey as an excuse.....we are listening.


murmur murmur murmur! Turkey is telling you what to do....murmur murmur
User avatar
zan
Leading Contributor
Leading Contributor
 
Posts: 16213
Joined: Wed Nov 02, 2005 8:55 pm

Postby pitsilos » Fri Dec 01, 2006 10:20 am

why use turkey as an excuse? because we like turkey hunting, thats all. you got something against turkey hunting?

it's so early and already turkey is sizzling.

the way i see it, turkey will be dragged inside out and still won't get in. unfair? who knows? feel sorry for them? yes? but that doesn't mean i don't want them out of my homeland.
pitsilos
Regular Contributor
Regular Contributor
 
Posts: 1846
Joined: Sat Oct 21, 2006 11:04 am

Postby zan » Fri Dec 01, 2006 10:52 am

pitsilos wrote:why use turkey as an excuse? because we like turkey hunting, thats all. you got something against turkey hunting?

it's so early and already turkey is sizzling.

the way i see it, turkey will be dragged inside out and still won't get in. unfair? who knows? feel sorry for them? yes? but that doesn't mean i don't want them out of my homeland.


Then get your government to talk to the TRNC and stop farting around playing silly games. Of course you cannot be seen talking to a pseudo state so you have to live in the hell you have created. We are an entity that you have to acknowledge whether you like it or not recognise we exist or you are only talking to yourselves.
User avatar
zan
Leading Contributor
Leading Contributor
 
Posts: 16213
Joined: Wed Nov 02, 2005 8:55 pm

Next

Return to Cyprus and the European Union

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests