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MY CYPRUS SOLUTION

Propose and discuss specific solutions to aspects of the Cyprus Problem

Postby gabaston » Sun Jul 03, 2005 11:05 am

Is there any logic in the following article?

http://www.cyprus-mail.com/news/main.ph ... 4&cat_id=1

Comment - A genuine solution for Cyprus
By Steve Kordas

BEFORE I start, I would like to introduce myself: I was born and raised in Athens, served my military term in Cyprus in the early 1970s and am now the managing director of the Treasury trading section at JP Morgan Chase (London). As an economist, I believe that our Greek Cypriot kinsmen appear to be drifting away from certain realities in Cyprus that may materialise into a serious issue for them if they do not grab hold of the opportunities of today.

Whether we believe it or not, Turkey will one day become a European Union member state. No matter how many times they are slapped in the face or undermined by the present EU countries and governments, I have no doubt that Turkey will eventually become a full member. The issue relating to Cyprus, however, is the concerning factor that President Tassos Papadopoulos appears to ignore, or is too hesitant to make the first political and historical moves to resolve.

I, and many in the Greek banking sector, strongly believe that our Greek Cypriot leaders should set aside their pride and strong beliefs and realise certain realities in order to make a decision that will benefit their people in the future. To concentrate on a federal-based formula that marries both communities under one umbrella with the least amount of restrictions would, in my view, be a major mistake on our behalf (both for Greece and Cyprus). If we fail to realise and accept a foundation agreement based only on two autonomous states, and rid ourselves of the reality that Northern Cyprus is now a Turkish Cypriot state, in the long term, we will have to accept certain harsh realities.

Under EU law, its constitution and system, if Turkey enters the EU as a full member and Cyprus is united under a bi-communal federal government, the threat to Cyprus of mass Turkish migration will be unstoppable. In practical terms, no law will be able to stop or control Turkey from sending thousands of refugees via Turkey, posing as Kurdish or other refugees, to Cyprus, claiming political asylum. This will inevitably change the demographic trend on the island and may one day see a majority Turkish population. There will also be no way to control the now influential and extremely rich and powerful Turkish businessmen in assisting their Turkish Cypriot kinsman in acquiring huge areas of land all over Cyprus. Let us not ignore a very important fact that the Turkey of today is almost a different country from the Turkey we knew in the 1970s. Turkey now boasts huge investments, economic progress, political gains and prefers not even to consider looking in the same direction as its military leaders. A federal Cyprus will only cater for the needs of Turkey’s expansionist strategy, where it now has the economic capability to flood Cyprus with more money that it can handle.

The above two points are only minor disadvantages of seeking a federal formula that will convert the Republic of Cyprus into a mini-Turkey. In my recent contacts with certain Turkish businessman, especially around the time of the Cyprus 2004 referendum, I noticed they were gearing up to assist their Turkish Cypriot relations in financing huge projects centred on areas only in south Cyprus. I sincerely hope that the Greek Cypriot leadership is aware of its actions regarding the search for a solution based on a unified Cyprus under one umbrella, and changes their current way of thinking.

At this moment in time, the Greek Cypriots, if they can see the realities and threats of the future, and swallow their unrealistic dreams, could actually gain a lot more if they secure a solution based on a two-state formula, now rather than later. If they can move fast enough, they may even be able to gain large areas of land in return for recognition of the Turkish Cypriot north, as opposed to having to accept their recognition in the future controlling 40 per cent of the land of Cyprus.

In securing a two-state, two-republic based formula, we will be able to protect and secure the hard work the Greek Cypriots have achieved to date in making the Republic of Cyprus an economically and politically successful state. I am afraid that if we waste any more time, especially considering the political advantages the Turkish Cypriots are now gaining on a daily basis, we may have to face the reality that all our hard work since 1974 will have gone to waste.



Copyright © Cyprus Mail 2005
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Postby Dhavlos » Sun Jul 03, 2005 11:27 am

Is there any logic in the following article?

sometimes he seems to want a solution, then he praises what has happened since '74. Odd article, but interesting all the same.

Within the TC remaining part GC's would have been able to re settle up to 30% of the population of those parts , over 25 years.


True yes...but however, what the GCs want is for everyone to be able to go back to where their property is. The same kind of percentages would have been applicable to the 'GC State'(im assuming) and as the TC population is much smaller in percentage that lived in the south, than GCs who lived in the north, it would have enabled all TCs to return to the south if they wished.
Also, who would decide who could go back and who couldnt...it would be totally unjust
Ok, if the above is not true then this would be.... only 30% of GCs would be able to live in the north, however due to Eu freedom of movement, any German/Brit etc... would be able to live up there. Freedom of movement would be restricted for TC/GCs who lived in their own country, while joe-bloggs from Germany could live wherever he wanted in cyprus.

TC army would be heavily reduced. Settlers would have been "Assisted" to return to Turkey.


basically for Gcs this would mean that turkish troops were still in cyprus and 'freedom' had not been 'acheived'. It would also be bad because im sure Greek and turkish armies would inevitabley stir some kind of ethnic tension. Im not supporting Greek armies in cyprus either...they should all piss off.
'Assisted' probably meant they would be told to go back, but if they didnt want to then it didnt matter(why would they, Turkey put most of them their cos they didnt want them)...meaning they would not go back...leading to further problems if GCs want to move back to their properties.

Do not tell me this is "Nothing"


Really, this is nothing in the sense of basic freedoms enshrined in the EU and UN. For GCs, they felt itaccepted the invasion and virtual partition of cyprus...all but in name

If this plan had been accepted , in 30-50 years time this Island would have been a Greek speaking Island completely.


Not really as the 'TC state' officail language would be Turkish, and schools would teach in turkish anyway etc...

I hope this gives some insight as to why GCs did not accept the A-plan... somethings may seem irrational, but it is an emotive subject. [/quote]
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Postby Kifeas » Sun Jul 03, 2005 12:13 pm

Steve Kordas article, "A genuine solution for Cyprus," describes precisely what would have been the case had the A-plan been accepted with all its provisions and formulas.

One of the reasons of its rejection is what Kordas projects in his article. What we are trying to secure is a Federal solution that will not allow what he clearly describes as the gradual "Turkification" of the whole of Cyprus to become a reality in the future. If this is not feasible, then I agree with him that the two recognised states solution is the second best option, provided that there will be serious territorial adjustments to reflect the population ratio between the two communities.
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Postby suetoniuspaulinus » Sun Jul 03, 2005 1:42 pm

Mr gabaston

Thank you for your input

Nice article.

So Cyprus will belong to Turkey after all eh?



:lol: :wink:
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Postby gabaston » Sun Jul 03, 2005 11:53 pm

sue n co
without a resolution there does seem to be that possibility.
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Postby Dhavlos » Mon Jul 04, 2005 12:22 pm

I think i have realised a basic conclusion on any cypriot solution. Tell me what you think.

Basically, any solution would either be

1) a bi-zonal type thing, where there is no political equalty from either side to the minority living in each zone....

OR

2) the solution would be of political equality(both 'parties' equally being able to vote for/against legislation in parliament), but without any bi-zonality.

My personal belief is that the solution should be based on 2) .
I feel it is the less controversial of the two and would produce a lasting peace/solution (mainly due to the fact it allows for free movement/ owneship of property etc... The first one however, i feel is divisive and would be worse than what it is like now (in terms of ethnic tensions etc.)
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Postby gabaston » Mon Jul 04, 2005 12:58 pm

dhavlos

sticking us all back together again imo would be a nightmare of epic proportions. Whilst there are many sane and good hearted cypriots, there are also nut cases as well. The problems we faced in cyprus from 1960 were not the result of the normal majority/well ballanced cypriots but of the minority nutcases, who got the silent support of the majority.

That minority still exists today though few in numbers. just read some of the posts in this forum. these people harbour thoughts of revenge and proving national superiority. They are bigots who will never change their views go to their graves sad and dissaiponted that they were unable to realise there dreams, or revenge wars and further bloodshed.

Its best to create for now a peaceful safe haven for tcs and gcs, and then allow future generations to solve the issue of complete reunification, once they understand the fact that as a united cyprus will be of greater benefit to all cypriots. For now tc's have 45 years of socio-economic catch-up to do before they are on par with their gc neighbours, integration now would keep tc's underdogs for the forseeable future.
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Postby Dhavlos » Mon Jul 04, 2005 1:12 pm

hmmmm, i see what you mean.

I think a solution will only come about after the 'older' generations have gone...i.e. all those involved in any way from 1960-about the late 70's. Its this lot that have caused the problem mainly.

I would hope that the majority of cypriots would now be more willing to silence the majority, now we know what happens if we dont.

Its in 10-20 years til a solution, but now we should be looking towards bi-communal relations...confidence building, and helping the infrastructure etc...of the north.

That minority still exists today though few in numbers. just read some of the posts in this forum. these people harbour thoughts of revenge and proving national superiority. They are bigots who will never change their views go to their graves sad and dissaiponted that they were unable to realise there dreams, or revenge wars and further bloodshed.


I agree. They need to be silenced for the safetly of the majority
(i dont care about human rights in this case because these views are detrimental/ negative towards others)
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Postby gabaston » Mon Jul 04, 2005 2:01 pm

i totally agree with what you said regarding the generations. my generation has too many memories- your generation is influenced by my generation, i think the best hope of a real peaceful coexistance will come from the generations following yours, but a lot depends on what they are told.
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Postby Viewpoint » Mon Jul 04, 2005 2:41 pm

gabaston
sticking us all back together again imo would be a nightmare of epic proportions. Whilst there are many sane and good hearted cypriots, there are also nut cases as well. The problems we faced in cyprus from 1960 were not the result of the normal majority/well ballanced cypriots but of the minority nutcases, who got the silent support of the majority.

That minority still exists today though few in numbers. just read some of the posts in this forum. these people harbour thoughts of revenge and proving national superiority. They are bigots who will never change their views go to their graves sad and dissaiponted that they were unable to realise there dreams, or revenge wars and further bloodshed.


Couldnt agree more, all have to do is look at the posts of;
Piratis
Main-Source
MicAtCyp
Agios Amvrosios

frightening and dangerous views that would not allow any unification solution work.
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