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Greek Tragedy

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Re: Greek Tragedy

Postby supporttheunderdog » Tue Nov 15, 2011 12:33 am

GreekIslandGirl wrote:
Get Real! wrote:
GreekIslandGirl wrote:
Get Real! wrote:It’s a shame they loved it so much because now they want to take it and put an end to your “Hellenic” dreams! :lol:

Thank you. Finally you've got it, Einstein! They loved Greece so much, they had to have it. Now, ditto for their 'new love' Cyprus.

Don’t get too excited Oracle, because it’s not your ancestors that built those! :lol:


I'm not the one claiming an unbroken umbilical cord connection to specific mud huts or erection of only one temple. I know my ancestors were great movers. :D They moved around all over the Hellenic world and one even got as far as mapping 'Bretannia' whilst its illiterate natives picked berries in readiness for becoming 'Europeans'.


Those natives had already spent an estimated 30 million man -hours building Stonehenge.

In North Wales they had extracted anything up to 1700 tonnes of raw copper from mines which had an estimated 10 miles of tunnels, which was exported to Europe.

Note quite the idle berry pickers you would try to portray.

Typical however of the Helleno-supremcists.
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Re: Greek Tragedy

Postby Hermes » Tue Nov 15, 2011 1:52 am

supporttheunderdog wrote:Those natives had already spent an estimated 30 million man -hours building Stonehenge.


Blimey! It's not the Pyramids though is it?
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Re: Greek Tragedy

Postby Hermes » Tue Nov 15, 2011 2:34 am

gardash wrote:But whilst the Greeks more or less stayed around the Med.the "Bretannians" went off and conquered the rest of the world.


Stayed around the Med? From Southern France to the Hindu Kush? I think you need some lessons in Ancient History...
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Re: Greek Tragedy

Postby bill cobbett » Tue Nov 15, 2011 2:36 am

Please let's not knock Stonehenge...

Firstly the earliest henge there pre-dates the earliest Pyramid by some hundreds of years, and naturally pre-dates by almost two millennia anything in not so ancient Greece.

Secondly don't judge Stonehenge on what you see remaining there today, you need to look at the wider area, at such things as Durrington Walls, processional avenues, other henges and barrows, which leads to a picture of a massive ceremonial landscape of square miles in area, of such significance, that whatever went on there, it drew pilgrims from as far away as the Alps.

... oh, and what have the blooming Ancient Egyptians ever done for us???
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Re: Greek Tragedy

Postby supporttheunderdog » Tue Nov 15, 2011 6:49 am

Hermes wrote:
supporttheunderdog wrote:Those natives had already spent an estimated 30 million man -hours building Stonehenge.


Blimey! It's not the Pyramids though is it?


And they ain't Greek either!
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Re: Greek Tragedy

Postby gardash » Tue Nov 15, 2011 10:01 am

GreekIslandGirl wrote:
gardash wrote:But whilst the Greeks more or less stayed around the Med.the "Bretannians" went off and conquered the rest of the world.


We spread only teachings and goodness! We lack the killer instinct.

(But, it did take those 'Brets' another 2,000 years to get their act together - since being discovered by Pytheas.)


Well, you lack being able to kill anyone face-to-face (EOKA).
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Re: Greek Tragedy

Postby gardash » Tue Nov 15, 2011 10:05 am

Hermes wrote:
gardash wrote:But whilst the Greeks more or less stayed around the Med.the "Bretannians" went off and conquered the rest of the world.


Stayed around the Med? From Southern France to the Hindu Kush? I think you need some lessons in Ancient History...


Last time I was there, Southern France was on the Med. Hindu Kush? If you got that far, why didn't you keep going? Of course, I forgot,you were still living at home and missed your Mums. :D
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Re: Greek Tragedy

Postby GreekIslandGirl » Tue Nov 15, 2011 11:37 am

Gardash, if you don't like the Meditteranean then why don't you bugger off! :D

The Greeks found paradise right here, so why should they go to erm ... Mongolia?

(Anyway, I do believe when population numbers are taken into account, the Hellenic Empire was the greatest - and was the least destructive whilst expanding - and most productive post-colonialism)
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Re: Greek Tragedy

Postby gardash » Tue Nov 15, 2011 11:54 am

GreekIslandGirl wrote:Gardash, if you don't like the Meditteranean then why don't you bugger off! :D

The Greeks found paradise right here, so why should they go to erm ... Mongolia?

(Anyway, I do believe when population numbers are taken into account, the Hellenic Empire was the greatest - and was the least destructive whilst expanding - and most productive post-colonialism)


Who said I didn't like the Med? Not me.
If the Greeks found paradise right here, why did they go anywhere else?

If you take population numbers into account, I bet that British India (including Pakistan) on its own outnumbered your Hellenic Empire.
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Re: Greek Miracle (prior to the Tragedy)

Postby kimon07 » Tue Nov 15, 2011 12:13 pm

“The Nazi occupation and plunder of Greece between 1941 and 1944 devastated the country’s economy, as foreign trade was suspended and agricultural output ground to a halt. The Nazis also forced the Greek treasury to pay huge amounts of “occupation expenses,” which caused hyperinflation when new money was printed to meet the obligation.

The period from the late 1950s to the late 1960s has been coined the era of the "Greek economic miracle." During this time, the country’s GDP grew at the fastest rate in Western Europe, averaging 7.6% annually throughout the 1960s. Industrial production grew at an average annual rate of 10% over the same period, exceeded in Western Europe only by Spain's performance. Manufacturing exports surpassed agricultural exports for the first time in Greece's history, partly because of large foreign investment in industry that boosted capital-intensive manufacturing activities. Oil refineries and petrochemical sectors developed along with chemical plants, pharmaceuticals, metallurgy, and electrical machinery. But economic growth and industrialization have their hazards. Social tensions erupted, prompted by inequitable distribution of wealth. The military junta that seized power in 1967 simply sided with big economic interests like large tourist enterprises and urban real estate, failing to solve the humanitarian problems sizzling beneath.

The energy crisis of 1973 and the subsequent international monetary turmoil affected the economy adversely. When exports could not cover the higher cost of foreign oil, a large deficit resulted in the Greek balance of payments, and the domestic economy suffered serious inflationary pressures. Such economic problems increased popular resistance to the dictatorship and contributed to its collapse in mid-1974.

The days of the Greek economic miracle were reaching a frayed end, and even the democratic governments that followed the junta were unable to restore growth. The annual GDP growth rate dropped from 7.6% in 1961-70 to 4.7% in 1971-80, and a mere 1.4% in 1981-90. Nevertheless, Greece picked up the fragments of its economy and began to re-orient itself after it became a member of the European Community (the EU today). It began a gradual shaping of its legislation to eventually accommodate full liberalization of trade and the movement of capital and labor. Entry into the EC also allowed an increase in imports, mainly of foreign manufactured goods. High budget deficits, public borrowing and other factors contributed to continuing economic stagnation creating critical imbalances in the economy which persisted into the mid-1990s.”

The whole article
http://www.thomaswhite.com/explore-the- ... reece.aspx


Also:

“However, 1953 was the starting point of the economic "Greek miracle". For twenty years, Greece had the highest growth rate internationally (after Japan). Despite the many political problems (which included a military junta from 1967 to 1974, the Cyprus problem and the outlawing of the Greek Communist Party from 1948 to 1974), Greece managed to transform itself, over a period of thirty years, from a destroyed (due to a long series of wars), underdeveloped small country to a country worthy of becoming a member of the (then) European Communities. Greece was accepted as the 10th member of the ECC in 1/1/1981. At the time, most of its economic indicators were better or equal to Ireland's (that was already a member), Spain's and Portugal's (which were to become members in 1986). The "Greek miracle", which was a textbook example, was basically the result of the policies of the Conservative politician Konstantinos Karamanlis who governed Greece from 1955 to 1963 and from 1974 to 1980, with a mix of Keynesian and Free-Market policies.”

http://jurist.law.pitt.edu/world/greececor3.htm
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