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The war against Syria

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Re: The war against Syria

Postby CBBB » Fri Aug 10, 2012 5:55 pm

www.globalresearch.ca looks like a good source for Yaloser!
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Re: The war against Syria

Postby kimon07 » Fri Aug 10, 2012 9:02 pm

CBBB wrote:http://www.globalresearch.ca looks like a good source for Yaloser!


And for me. Thank yoy Robin Hood.
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Re: The war against Syria

Postby yialousa1971 » Tue Aug 14, 2012 1:43 am

Syrian army advances into another insurgent-held district in Aleppo
Mon Aug 13, 2012 2:16PM GMT
source: http://www.presstv.ir/detail/2012/08/13 ... f-aldawla/

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Syrian troops in the restive city of Aleppo (File Photo)

The Syrian army has advanced into another insurgent-held district in the flashpoint city of Aleppo as the military operation to clear the northern city of armed groups enters its sixth day.

Syrian troops entered the western district of Saif al-Dawla on Monday and heavy clashes are still taking place in the area.

There are also reports of fighting in several other Aleppo districts including Sukari.

The army has launched a mop-up operation against insurgents in the northern city of Aleppo since Wednesday and so far, several districts, including insurgents' stronghold of Salahuddin, have been cleared of terrorist groups.

A large number of insurgents have also been killed, injured and arrested in Aleppo since the beginning of the operation.

Meanwhile, Syrian troops have attacked an insurgent hideout in the city of Talbisah in Homs Province, killing a large number of them.

The army has also clashed with armed anti-government groups in Ariha, Idlib and Homs countryside of al-Ghanto.

Syria has been the scene of deadly unrest since mid-March, 2011 and many people, including large numbers of army and security personnel, have been killed in the violence.

Syrian President Bashar al-Assad said on August 1 that the country is engaged in a ''crucial and heroic'' battle that will determine the destiny of the nation.
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Re: The war against Syria

Postby yialousa1971 » Sat Aug 18, 2012 7:04 pm

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Re: The war against Syria

Postby yialousa1971 » Sat Aug 18, 2012 8:56 pm

British Convert to Islam Vows to Fight to the Death on Syrian Rebel Front Line

A British Muslim convert from east London is fighting on the front line of the battle for Aleppo after joining rebels in their struggle against Bashar al-Assad’s regime.


By Richard Spencer, Salaheddin, Aleppo

7:54PM BST 16 Aug 2012

The jihadist, who lived in Walthamstow, has joined an Islamist brigade as it fights for control of Syria’s second city.


While he refused to give his real name, he agreed to speak to The Daily Telegraph in a field hospital behind the front line in the contested Aleppo suburb of Salaheddin. The Londoner, who called himself “Abu Yacoub” — father of Jacob — is the first proven case of a Briton being where the fighting is fiercest in Syria.


He was with an Iraqi friend, Hassan, who had received a minor bullet wound in the leg, and was taking him to the field hospital for treatment.


He disclosed that he had converted to Islam five years ago and had arrived in Syria earlier this year to join the revolutionary forces seeking to overthrow President Assad.


“I will stay here until I die,” he said. “I want to die in Syria. We must all taste paradise, and when that happens is decided already.”

As the sound of tank shells hitting the buildings of Salaheddin sounded out in the background, Abu Yacoub agreed to speak a little about himself.

Clearly nervous at being discovered by a reporter, he spoke in an accent that was a mixture of East London and a jokey version of gangster rap and said he came from Walthamstow.

“The name I give might be a lie,” he said, when calling himself Abu Yacoub. “Everything I say might be a lie.”

He mixed humour with smiling threats, feigning joy at meeting a fellow Londoner with attempts to have reporters thrown out of the clinic. He began to chat about Hackney and Walthamstow, but then suddenly stopped. He appeared uninterested in the Olympics.

He and Hassan had been fighting with Ahrar al-Sham, “Free Men of Syria”, the biggest Islamist group in Aleppo. It is estimated to have 500 members.

By contrast, the Liwa al-Tawhid — Unity Brigade — which is leading the battle and is made up largely of people from the towns and villages in the north of the province, says it has up to 8,000 men, and makes up almost 80 per cent of the total force.

Abu Yacoub said he arrived in Syria four months ago. “I came to help the people here,” he said.

“Allah knows,” he said, when asked whether he was married, and other details of his personal life. But he said that his mother, although she was Christian, knew where he was and what he was doing and was “cool” with it. “She is a good woman,” he said.

The Daily Telegraph has since learnt that he was born in Tanzania but came to Britain as a child.

He refused to allow himself to be photographed, adding with a laugh: “If you take a photograph maybe it’s very bad for your reputation. Maybe you will die tomorrow.”

Members of Ahrar al-Sham are largely followers of Salafi Islam, the conservative, but not necessarily violent, version followed in Saudi Arabia. It is less feared than Jubhat al-Nusra, which is said to be allied to al-Qaeda and which announced its existence this year with a claim of responsibility for a number of bombing attacks on regime targets.

Despite concerns in the West and among their own ranks, rebel leaders say they accept help from Islamist groups and foreigners, and will deal with the consequences later.

However, even within the radical Islamist brigades, foreign fighters are a small minority and mostly from Arab countries, including Lebanon, Libya, Tunisia and Morocco,

Abdulrahman al-Salameh, a Jubhat al-Nusra leader in Aleppo, said his ranks contained foreign fighters and Syrian fighters who had fought the Americans in Iraq, a particular concern for the West because of that cause’s takeover by al-Qaeda. But he also said he knew of British fighters in other brigades.

John Cantlie, a freelance journalist who was kidnapped briefly by a group of international jihadists who seized the Bab al-Hawa border crossing last month, said some of his captors had British accents.

The role of foreign fighters is hotly disputed in rebel ranks. One story — possibly apocryphal — is that two Indian Muslim jihadists who arrived in Homs saying they wanted to die for Allah were immediately sent by secular FSA leaders to attack one of the toughest checkpoints in the city. The checkpoint was destroyed and the two men were killed, which meant, said the secular activist who told the story, that everyone was happy.

But many media activists and rebels fear they are a liability, adding little to the cause and attracting suspicion among potential backers in the West.

Watching “Abu Yacoub” and Hassan return laughing to the front, one Syrian fighter at the hospital snarled. “Why have they come here?” he said. “We don’t need them. They come for jihad but some of them are extremists and here in Syria we are not extremists.”

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldne ... line.html#
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Re: The war against Syria

Postby yialousa1971 » Sat Aug 18, 2012 9:11 pm

"He will not survive," my Syrian friend said, and I think he was right.


The man on the state television was bearded down to his chest, a self-confessed Salafist – nom de guerre "Abu Dolha", real name Ahmed Ali Gharibo. A Syrian – "alas," said my friend – from the Ghouta district of Damascus. He admitted, right there in front of the cameras, that he "regretted" killing 200 people with his own hands.

What did it take to get a man like this to admit such things on television? Sitting up in this breezy villa, 16 miles from Damascus – Bashar's brother Maher lives just round the corner – I could well believe what my friend said: Ahmed Gharibo will not survive.

Like all civil conflicts, rumours turn into facts, facts into rumours. Damascus is almost deserted, near-empty boulevards with more military checkpoints than traffic lights, some "mukhabarat" security, some army, the occasional "shabiha", friendly to me – they would be, wouldn't they, as I drive towards the elite mansions outside town – but a bit down-at-heel.

"How in the West, being advocates of democracy and liberty and freedom, can you support these people?" my friend asks. "Do your readers know that Her Majesty sends weapons and money to these people?"

I am about to point out that HMG claims that it doesn't give weapons at all – the word "claim" is all-important in Syria these days, like the conspiracy theory of history.

"The first step to dismantle Iran is to dismantle Syria – we are isolated and 123 countries are against us; that was the figure of those who gathered for the so-called 'Friends of Syria' conference in Paris."

I begin to think of the Serbs and their total conviction that the world was against them, that their innocence was without question. Ah, but like the old Yugoslavia, you only have to walk the streets of Damascus to realise that the storm has not yet fully broken. Behind the walls of the old French mandate barracks down from Umayyad Square, the burned wreckage of this week's fuel-truck bomb stands below a wizened tree. Was it aimed at the run-down "caserne" that the Syrian army still uses or a little trick for the UN officers in the Dama Rose Hotel across the road? The last 100 military observers are packing for the road journey to Beirut airport on Wednesday. The transit point of Beirut rather than Damascus airport tells its own story. "We are defunct in five days," I heard one of the UN officers say in the lobby. Funny word, "defunct", French for dead.


But maybe the truck bomber wanted the UN dead too? Shortly after the explosion, several aimed shots were fired at the UN's third-floor hotel offices. Is it true that a Syrian camera crew were already on the eighth floor, ready to tape the bomb? That ambulances came within three minutes?

The UN were beginning to realise that their men were increasingly endangered in the provinces. In Aleppo, they started off with a 30-mile radius of the city and within months, their government escorts would not venture beyond the last government checkpoint on the city limits. The rebels were less friendly to the UN, and several of the international observers saw foreign fighters among the "Free Syrian Army".

Last week – the UN has not exactly advertised the fact – a security man working for the UN, a former government security agent, was kidnapped and tortured and then murdered near his home north of Damascus. They found 20 bullet wounds in his body. The UN's men are not talking – rarely have they been so uncommunicative – but they have counted the corpses in Artous, 25 miles west of Damascus, 70 bodies in all, Sunnis, in a mass grave, just two weeks ago. Killed, it seems, by the "shabiha".

The FSA have been well and truly cleared out of the centre of Damascus – the suburbs at night are a different matter – and few Damascenes seem to believe that the armed rebels are winning in Aleppo.

"The Christians are protesting," another Syrian friend tells me. "The Greek Catholic Archbishop of Aleppo has just made an appeal to the Western powers not to send weapons to the fundamentalists. The Syrian Catholic church in Aleppo has now been bombed."

How does one reply to all this? Does the Syrian government really want the UN to leave? "No!" cries my friend. "We want UN pressure here to force these 'people' into dialogue."

The Salafist told his audience today that his enemies were "Alawites [of course, for Bashar al-Assad is an Alawite] and Shiites and Christians". So is that it? War by television? An acknowledgement that the man won't live long beyond this broadcast. And the UN are indeed leaving. There is an idea of a miniscule office remaining in Damascus with a military and a political observer. But otherwise, the great gloomy eyes of the UN donkey will close sleepily on Wednesday; it's the failure of another mission – and not a single international soldier will be left behind to watch the storm burst.

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world ... ml?afid=af
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Re: The war against Syria

Postby yialousa1971 » Sun Aug 19, 2012 4:39 am

Syrian rebels studies terror tactics in Kosovo

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Re: The war against Syria

Postby kimon07 » Sun Aug 19, 2012 3:46 pm

British Bases of Cyprus and German spy ship aiding Syrian Rebels.

By AFP
Posted Sunday, August 19 2012 at 06:36

British intelligence on Syrian troop movements is helping rebels launch successful attacks on regime forces, a Sunday newspaper reported, quoting an opposition official.
The Sunday Times weekly said the disclosure by the official was the first indication that British intelligence was playing a covert role in the anti-regime revolt which first erupted in March 2011.
The newspaper quoted the official as saying British authorities "know about and approve 100%" intelligence from their Cyprus military bases being passed through Turkey to the rebel troops of the Free Syrian Army (FSA).


More:

http://www.nation.co.ke/News/world/Syri ... index.html

http://www.muslimnews.co.uk/news/news.php?article=23106


http://islamversuseurope.blogspot.gr/20 ... lping.html
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Re: The war against Syria

Postby Southerner » Mon Aug 20, 2012 12:14 am

yialousa1971 wrote:Iran to conduct joint exercises with Syria?

What are they going to do press ups or sit ups?
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Re: The war against Syria

Postby wyoming cowboy » Wed Aug 22, 2012 3:48 pm

what a mystery this whole east Mediterranean thing is becoming.....US/Russian cooperation, then Russian/Chinese battleships sailing there, US/Israel/Greece/Cyprus maritime maneuvers.....US/Turk cooperation etc etc....who is fighting who?
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