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Should Greece extradite the fugitive Turkish soldiers?

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Re: Should Greece extradite the fugitive Turkish soldiers?

Postby Paphitis » Wed Sep 21, 2016 3:12 pm

Tim Drayton wrote:
Paphitis wrote:Btw, we all know very well that Turkey has been DAESH's and Al Nusra's biggest supporter.


Agreed. Either, as some conspiracy theorists would have it, the West clandestinely created and continues to support Daesh, or Turkey has managed to slip the lead as a Western puppet and is managing to toe a more independent line. One plausible theory accounting for the 15 July coup, in my opinion, was that it was staged by the USA as a means to bring Erdoğan back into line.


I don't believe the Coalition is supporting DAESH. The coalition has done some excellent work in bringing DAESH to the verge of collapse.

But Turkey has been supporting DAESH and so has Saudi Arabia and Qatar. Erdogan wants a caliphate or an Ottoman Empire but that is not going to happen.

I have my theory as to what the Turks have on the coalition.
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Re: Should Greece extradite the fugitive Turkish soldiers?

Postby supporttheunderdog » Wed Sep 21, 2016 3:18 pm

They appear to be genuine political refugees (as oppossed to Economic Migrants) and should be granted Asylum
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Re: Should Greece extradite the fugitive Turkish soldiers?

Postby Tim Drayton » Wed Sep 21, 2016 3:29 pm

The most curious and puzzling aspect of the 15 July coup - apart from the fact that you carry out coups in the middle of the night and not early in the evening when everybody is awake - is the missing four hours. It has been established that the Turkish intelligence service learned of the coup very soon after it started. On the other hand, according to President Erdoğan's account of the events, he didn't find out about the coup until four hours later. Given that Erdoğan has the intelligence service in his pocket and its boss, Hakan Fidan, is widely considered to be his place man, it defies belief that he didn't know about something so crucial when the intelligence service did. All this lends credence to theories that the coup was somehow started by one grouping or other, perhaps by tricking the Gulenists embedded in the armed forces that if they made the first move they would follow suit, who then used it to threaten Erdoğan to do their bidding otherwise they would back the coup and Erdoğan would be dead. The missing four hours could have been the time when these negotiations were taking place. It is noteworthy that the commandos who were sent to the hotel where Erdoğan was staying said in their testimony that they were sure they could have finished off the job if allowed to move in and they felt they were being held back.
If it was the US that was involved, I think this could explain why Erdoğan went off to meet Putin and acted in such a conciliatory manner. I have already come to the conclusion that the Americans and Russians have come to some kind of secret deal over Syria and Iraq, and it could be that they needed to Turkey to change its stance towards these countries and Russia, and they had to force Erdoğan to change his line. This would mean that the meeting in Moscow was an act of compliance with US wishes rather than being a sign of Turkey shifting axis, which is hard to believe.
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Re: Should Greece extradite the fugitive Turkish soldiers?

Postby Paphitis » Wed Sep 21, 2016 4:01 pm

I am all for a deal between Russia and America. Believe me, I think it is for the best if the Status Quo remains in terms of Russia maintaining Syria.

However, I hope the Americans have made no deal unless it also includes transition to a National Unity Government and Assad facing justice.

As far as I am concerned, if Assad is handed over the Russians can occupy the entire friggin country, if they want and we withdraw. As long as the Kurds are ok, then all is good.

What won't work is a military solution which should only apply to DAESH and Al Nusra and a few other trouble makers. Attempted Annihilation of Sunni groups and their people will only make things even more worse.

If Pootin is serious, this war can end overnight!

Really a huge Shane on everyone if Chemical Warfare continues without anyone caring.
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Re: Should Greece extradite the fugitive Turkish soldiers?

Postby GreekIslandGirl » Wed Sep 21, 2016 5:02 pm

They are NATO soldiers. They should be handed in to NATO HQ.
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Re: Should Greece extradite the fugitive Turkish soldiers?

Postby Paphitis » Thu Sep 22, 2016 2:03 am

These guys can prove to be very useful to Greece.

Personally, I think Greece would be crazy not to grant asylum, not to mention the fact it is probably illegal because they are legitimate refugees.

They can't be sent back to face the Death Penalty as Erdogan has promised.
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