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Greek in Turkish in Cyprus

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Postby garbitsch » Mon Apr 25, 2005 12:22 am

Some people consider Azerbaijani as a dialect of Turkish, but this is debateable. Well obviously these people speak Turkish, but somehow (may be due to a policy of Soviet) they do not consider their language as "Azerbaijani Turkish", they rather call it Azeri (Moldovans speak Romanian but call it Moldovan). BTW they are made fun of very much as well :) Like, for "plane is landing" they use "dusmek" which means "to fall down", which every time drives the Turks in the Azeri aeroplanes crazy (they always think the plane will fall).
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Postby insan » Mon Apr 25, 2005 12:39 am

WE consider our accent more practical in contrast to standard Turkish. e.g:
Geliyor musun? (Are you coming?) is said in standard Turkish, but "gelecen?" is used by T. Cypriots.


Garbitsh, either we have different dialects or there are some mistakes in your examples.

We pronounce "geliyor musun" as geliyormung? Don't we?


As for the "geleceng"; should be the equivelant of "You will come" or with a questioning accentuation "will you come?". "geleceng" can also be pronounced as "gelecekming" as a question.


Also Cypriot Turkish does not have question tags (hope i am using this word correctly). Such as:
In Turkey you ask: Evli misin? means "Are you married?" , but in Cypriot you go "Evlisin?", which in fact means "you are married" when it is not used as a question.


And according to the TC dialect I use; "evli misin" is pronounced either as "evliming" e.g "evliming deyilming yau?" - official> "evli misin değil misin?" or it can also be pronounced as "evlising" e.g "kimiynan evlising?"-official > "kimle evlisin?"
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Postby magikthrill » Mon Apr 25, 2005 1:01 am

Main_Source wrote:I dont understand the mainland Greek dialect at all lol. Was going to Cyprus via Athens airport and they had different words for everything.


Hmm thats pretty weird. Do you remember any of these words?
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Postby garbitsch » Mon Apr 25, 2005 2:48 pm

insan, there is a little distinction between the standard Turkish and Cypriot accent when using tenses. Turks in Turkey usually use "present continuous tense", however we generally use "simple present tense". Even when they say "napiyosun?" we say "napan?". That's what I have experienced when I was living in Turkey. As what you said are all correct, but I wasn't meaning the literal equivalences, but the practical usage.
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Postby insan » Mon Apr 25, 2005 3:04 pm

insan, there is a little distinction between the standard Turkish and Cypriot accent when using tenses. Turks in Turkey usually use "present continuous tense", however we generally use "simple present tense". Even when they say "napiyosun?" we say "napan?".



This is true. We the TCs mostly use simple present tense instead of present continious tense.

And don't forget to put a "g" at the end of "napan". You know, there should be a "g" there. :wink: Though the British TC accent also differs from the indigenous TC accent. Perhaps that's why you don't pronounce the "g" at the end of the word.
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Postby garbitsch » Mon Apr 25, 2005 3:10 pm

No, I pronounce napan with g in the end, but I don't spell it that way. That's what I do when I chat with my friends :) that is because the T.C accent has no written form. BTW, I am not a British T.C, just came here last year 8)
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Postby insan » Mon Apr 25, 2005 3:26 pm

garbitsch wrote:No, I pronounce napan with g in the end, but I don't spell it that way. That's what I do when I chat with my friends :) that is because the T.C accent has no written form. BTW, I am not a British T.C, just came here last year 8)



Ok, then. Your English sounds perfect. That's why I thought that you are most probably a British TC.
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Postby Kifeas » Mon Apr 25, 2005 7:38 pm

Insan wrote:This is almost same for TC dialect. Greek(the Greek dialect of Rums) has much influence on TC dialect. A similar sounding dialect can be seen in Aegean region where once mostly Greeks(Rum = Ottoman Greeks) were living.



The term “Rum” in Turkish derives from the Greek term “Romios” which was the name that was used to once describe the Greek-speaking citizens of the Byzantine Empire. This term, in its turn, originates from the times of the Roman empire during which, every person living within it’s boundaries was called a Roman Citizen.

With the split of the Roman Empire into two parts, i.e. between the West Roman empire with Rome being it’s capital and the East Roman Empire, later renamed as Byzantine, with Konstantinoupolis being it’s capital; all the Greek speaking citizens of the later, retained from the previously used term “Roman citizen,” or in Greek “Romeos Politis” which was reduced to term “Romios,” or “Rum” in Turkish.

During the period of the Ottoman Empire, all the Greek speaking /Christian Orthodox people living within it’s boundaries were called “Romie” (plural of Romios,) and “Rum” in Turkish. All such people of today’s mainland Greece, Asia Minor (Anatolia,) Konstantinoupolis, Cyprus, the Balkans, etc., were called “Romie” or “Rum.”

With Greece independence from the Ottoman Empire after 1821, the people of the newly founted state (modern Greece) begun to be called by the Turks with a new name as “Yunan” which derives from “Iones” or “Ionian” in English, which ironically is one of the many ancient Greek “tribes” that used to live on the Ionian coasts of Asian Minor (hence the term Ionian Civilisation.) On the other hand, the Greeks of Asia minor (Anatolia) who remained under the Ottoman Empire and theoretically were the descendants of the Ionian Greeks, remained to be called “Romie,” since they were still under the Ottoman empire.

Now, the term Greeks that is used in most western languages, i.e., English, French, German, Italian, etc, comes from the name or term “Gregos” or “Gregie,” which was the name of another of the ancient Greek “tribes” that used to live in nowadays central Greece.

In Greek language, classical and modern, (with the exception of the periods of Roman, Byzantine and Ottoman empire in which they were called “Romeie” or “Romie” or “Rum,”) all the Greeks (all the various “tribes,”) are called “Hellen” or “Hellines.” In Cyprus there are references of Achaean, Mycenaean, Arcadian Greeks, etc.

In Cyprus, in a similar fashion like the rest the Greek speaking or Orthodox people living under the Ottoman Empire, the Ottomans called GCs “Rum”, a termed remained in the Turkish language during the British Empire and even after independence in 1960. The British never used this term (i.e. “Romie,”) but instead they adopted the term Greek Cypriots (GCs.) Greek Cypriots, after Greek independence in 1821, gradually abandoned the term “Romie” and adopted the term Hellenic Cypriot or Hellino-Kyprios in Greek.
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Postby Main_Source » Tue Apr 26, 2005 12:26 am

Magikthrill...not that weird...I thought it was common knowledge that the mainland Greeks use a lot of modern words. One example was the word used for bag/luggage...the lady said one long long word....I looked confused...then she knew i was Cypriot and just said 'valitses' instead...which then made sense to me lol.
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Postby magikthrill » Tue Apr 26, 2005 5:16 am

main source i hope you dont mean the word "aposkeves" ???

is that not a common word in Cyprus?
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