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Problems with Turkish pipeline

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Re: Problems with Turkish pipeline

Postby Pyrpolizer » Thu Oct 11, 2018 2:20 pm

MR-from-NG wrote:
Pyrpolizer wrote:imo with today's conditions it's nearly impossible for anyone to really make it in a foreign country, unless his/her job does not have a measurable output because that's the No1 criterion in the private sector. Mots young Cypriots I know, end up doing Government jobs, professors at Universities or doctors. The UK may still be an exception mostly because the British are more welcoming and also because of the numbers of Cypriots already living there.
Most Greeks I know living in the US just have pizza shops!

Kikapu may I ask what kind of job you were doing in SF? I don't mean the exact description only whether you were working in the public sector or the private one, or perhaps a subsidiary of a Swiss company.

I think he had a hot dog stall. Kikapu? :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:


Wot? No kebab a la Lordo style?? :lol: :lol: :lol:
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Re: Problems with Turkish pipeline

Postby Get Real! » Thu Oct 11, 2018 2:22 pm

MR-from-NG wrote:I think he had a hot dog stall. Kikapu? :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

I think he once mentioned running a Makarios paraphernalia 2nd hand shop for a few years… :?
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Re: Problems with Turkish pipeline

Postby MR-from-NG » Thu Oct 11, 2018 2:24 pm

Pyrpolizer wrote:
MR-from-NG wrote:
Pyrpolizer wrote:imo with today's conditions it's nearly impossible for anyone to really make it in a foreign country, unless his/her job does not have a measurable output because that's the No1 criterion in the private sector. Mots young Cypriots I know, end up doing Government jobs, professors at Universities or doctors. The UK may still be an exception mostly because the British are more welcoming and also because of the numbers of Cypriots already living there.
Most Greeks I know living in the US just have pizza shops!

Kikapu may I ask what kind of job you were doing in SF? I don't mean the exact description only whether you were working in the public sector or the private one, or perhaps a subsidiary of a Swiss company.

I think he had a hot dog stall. Kikapu? :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:


Wot? No kebab a la Lordo style?? :lol: :lol: :lol:

Kebab needs a bit of capital to set up. Hot dog stalls need very little :lol: :lol: :lol:
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Re: Problems with Turkish pipeline

Postby Paphitis » Thu Oct 11, 2018 2:24 pm

Pyrpolizer wrote:imo with today's conditions it's nearly impossible for anyone to really make it in a foreign country, unless his/her job does not have a measurable output because that's the No1 criterion in the private sector. Mots young Cypriots I know, end up doing Government jobs, professors at Universities or doctors. The UK may still be an exception mostly because the British are more welcoming and also because of the numbers of Cypriots already living there.
Most Greeks I know living in the US just own pizza shops!

Kikapu may I ask what kind of job you were doing in SF? I don't mean the exact description only whether you were working in the public sector or the private one, or perhaps a subsidiary of a Swiss company.


America isn't exactly a foreign country to Australia. We have gotten so close with the Yanks, the delineation between Australia and USA is very blurred. And I mean it is very blurred.

Culturally, very similar. They way we talk and behave is similar as well. There are quite a lot of bonds. Somehow we have fought in every single war together for the last 100 years. it's like if one goes, the other will follow. Not even once has there been an occasion where the US and Australia didn't join together in any particular war.

Plus there are many Yanks that have moved to Australia and vice versa. You will make it if you have a good job. Usually, when a business sponsors you in with a Green Card and Health Insurance, its not going to be a bad job.

The only risk is not liking living in places like New Jersey. It depends what you are use to.

In addition, the Americans generally give everyone a fair go. They don't particularly care what you are. I have a cousin Realtor in NY. Another cousin is a Lawyer in LA. All Cypriots and they are thriving.
Last edited by Paphitis on Thu Oct 11, 2018 2:26 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Problems with Turkish pipeline

Postby MR-from-NG » Thu Oct 11, 2018 2:24 pm

Get Real! wrote:
MR-from-NG wrote:I think he had a hot dog stall. Kikapu? :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

I think he once mentioned running a Makarios paraphernalia 2nd hand shop for a few years… :?

:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:
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Re: Problems with Turkish pipeline

Postby Pyrpolizer » Thu Oct 11, 2018 2:25 pm

MR-from-NG wrote:

Kebab needs a bit of capital to set up. Hot dog stalls need very little :lol: :lol: :lol:


Aha! :wink:
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Re: Problems with Turkish pipeline

Postby Get Real! » Thu Oct 11, 2018 2:27 pm

MR-from-NG wrote:
GR wrote:I think he once mentioned running a Makarios paraphernalia 2nd hand shop for a few years… :?

:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

But it wasn’t until he added a Grivas section that business really picked up… :?
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Re: Problems with Turkish pipeline

Postby Pyrpolizer » Thu Oct 11, 2018 2:31 pm

Paphitis wrote:
Pyrpolizer wrote:imo with today's conditions it's nearly impossible for anyone to really make it in a foreign country, unless his/her job does not have a measurable output because that's the No1 criterion in the private sector. Mots young Cypriots I know, end up doing Government jobs, professors at Universities or doctors. The UK may still be an exception mostly because the British are more welcoming and also because of the numbers of Cypriots already living there.
Most Greeks I know living in the US just own pizza shops!

Kikapu may I ask what kind of job you were doing in SF? I don't mean the exact description only whether you were working in the public sector or the private one, or perhaps a subsidiary of a Swiss company.


America isn't exactly a foreign country to Australia. We have gotten so close with the Yanks, the delineation between Australia and USA is very blurred. And I mean it is very blurred.

Culturally, very similar. They way we talk and behave is similar as well. There are quite a lot of bonds. Somehow we have fought in every single war together for the last 100 years. it's like if one goes, the other will follow. Not even once has there been an occasion where the US and Australia didn't join together in any particular war.

Plus there are many Yanks that have moved to Australia and vice versa. You will make it if you have a good job. Usually, when a business sponsors you in with a Green Card and Health Insurance, its not going to be a bad job.

The only risk is not liking living in places like New Jersey. It depends what you are use to.

In addition, the Americans generally give everyone a fair go. They don't particularly care what you are. I have a cousin Realtor in NY. Another cousin is a Lawyer in LA. All Cypriots and they are thriving.


Cypriots born and raised in Cyprus or 2nd Generation Cypriots from Australia? Also how old are they?
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Re: Problems with Turkish pipeline

Postby MR-from-NG » Thu Oct 11, 2018 2:33 pm

Get Real! wrote:
MR-from-NG wrote:
GR wrote:I think he once mentioned running a Makarios paraphernalia 2nd hand shop for a few years… :?

:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

But it wasn’t until he added a Grivas section that business really picked up… :?

I wonder if he had Yorgagis, Papadopuolos and Sampson in his inventory? Come on Kicks, the suspense is killing me....how did you survive in this ruthless jungle :?: :lol:
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Re: Problems with Turkish pipeline

Postby Paphitis » Thu Oct 11, 2018 2:37 pm

Pyrpolizer wrote:
Paphitis wrote:
Pyrpolizer wrote:imo with today's conditions it's nearly impossible for anyone to really make it in a foreign country, unless his/her job does not have a measurable output because that's the No1 criterion in the private sector. Mots young Cypriots I know, end up doing Government jobs, professors at Universities or doctors. The UK may still be an exception mostly because the British are more welcoming and also because of the numbers of Cypriots already living there.
Most Greeks I know living in the US just own pizza shops!

Kikapu may I ask what kind of job you were doing in SF? I don't mean the exact description only whether you were working in the public sector or the private one, or perhaps a subsidiary of a Swiss company.


America isn't exactly a foreign country to Australia. We have gotten so close with the Yanks, the delineation between Australia and USA is very blurred. And I mean it is very blurred.

Culturally, very similar. They way we talk and behave is similar as well. There are quite a lot of bonds. Somehow we have fought in every single war together for the last 100 years. it's like if one goes, the other will follow. Not even once has there been an occasion where the US and Australia didn't join together in any particular war.

Plus there are many Yanks that have moved to Australia and vice versa. You will make it if you have a good job. Usually, when a business sponsors you in with a Green Card and Health Insurance, its not going to be a bad job.

The only risk is not liking living in places like New Jersey. It depends what you are use to.

In addition, the Americans generally give everyone a fair go. They don't particularly care what you are. I have a cousin Realtor in NY. Another cousin is a Lawyer in LA. All Cypriots and they are thriving.


Cypriots born and raised in Cyprus or 2nd Generation Cypriots from Australia? Also how old are they?


Both these were not born in the US. The Realtor and the Lawyer (Brother and Sister btw) were born in Cyprus but lived in Athens for a while before she married an American Greek and he went to the USA to study and never desired to leave. He stayed and eventually opened his own firm as well.

But there are some other cousins that were born there, all with varying degree of successes. They all work, and own property and doing ok for themselves. They are typical Americans with Cypriot Greek names.

And overall just very nice people. Americans are very polite.

I think it is very easy for an Aussie to live in America and vice versa for a Yank to live in Australia. As long as you can adapt to the lifestyle. East Coast Australia is very much very similar to West Coast America (California).
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