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All roads eventually lead to Cyprus...

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Re: All roads eventually lead to Cyprus...

Postby Kikapu » Tue Feb 11, 2020 1:15 am

Paphitis wrote:Thanks Kikapu.

I certainly won't be risking any criminal conviction so will comply with all US Laws - including tax declaration obligations.

What is unclear though is how they tax individuals like myself as I don't have any flush personal accounts in Australia.

I do have however, some business accounts, and also some loans. These are registered in Australia and hence tax is paid and levied on any profit at the company tax rate.

I doubt the US is able to tax these Australian Registered Companies. But I will definitely ask what my obligations are and whether I should declare them or if it only applies to personal accounts. Whatever the case may be, I will be following the letter of the law.

Process is starting to get real now. They have been in tough with me overnight via email, and want me to specify a time for the first interview.

The US Agent, has also been in contact this morning telling me they will be in touch shortly and tell me when the interview is so he can prepare me for it. So I sent him an email and awaiting his response.

Another interesting bit of information is that they have this Rotor Program where they are converting US Military Rotor Pilots to fix wing. They will be on course with us if we get there, but they start 3 months earlier at the Academy for their fix wing conversion. Failure rate is 25% for these guys as they got no fixed wing time, but they put in a lot of resources to get them through because most of them are vets as well.

The rest of the intake are all Australians apparently. failure rate among the Aussies is extremely low.

So the US Agent said I should have no problem at all fitting in with either group. The Aussies usually stick together and are clicky but he says you probably find a place in both groups.


As I’ve said, you are not going to get taxed twice, but the USA wants to know what your financial interest are, accounts numbers, amount in value, address where account is kept, privately or jointly held.

Good luck with your interviews.

I just got back from San Francisco which the captain of Swiss thought it would be good idea to try and ride the strong Jetstream across North America and the Atlantic with 350km/hr tailwind to save about 45 minutes, but is was the bumpiest flight I have ever taken. It was never ending from about 3 hours after take off to about 2 hours before landing, almost 5 hours of heavy turbulence. They didn’t even serve coffee with breakfast as the flight attendants were strapped in their seats most of the time before breakfast, which was smooth flying by this time. I couldn’t eat anything after being what seemed like being in a “ tumble dryer” for 5 hours. Just needed coffee, but there wasn’t any. :D

I would have preferred if we arrived on scheduled time and flown the normal route over Greenland and Iceland, instead of across the open sea of the Atlantic.
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Re: All roads eventually lead to Cyprus...

Postby Paphitis » Tue Feb 11, 2020 4:11 am

Kikapu wrote:
Paphitis wrote:Thanks Kikapu.

I certainly won't be risking any criminal conviction so will comply with all US Laws - including tax declaration obligations.

What is unclear though is how they tax individuals like myself as I don't have any flush personal accounts in Australia.

I do have however, some business accounts, and also some loans. These are registered in Australia and hence tax is paid and levied on any profit at the company tax rate.

I doubt the US is able to tax these Australian Registered Companies. But I will definitely ask what my obligations are and whether I should declare them or if it only applies to personal accounts. Whatever the case may be, I will be following the letter of the law.

Process is starting to get real now. They have been in tough with me overnight via email, and want me to specify a time for the first interview.

The US Agent, has also been in contact this morning telling me they will be in touch shortly and tell me when the interview is so he can prepare me for it. So I sent him an email and awaiting his response.

Another interesting bit of information is that they have this Rotor Program where they are converting US Military Rotor Pilots to fix wing. They will be on course with us if we get there, but they start 3 months earlier at the Academy for their fix wing conversion. Failure rate is 25% for these guys as they got no fixed wing time, but they put in a lot of resources to get them through because most of them are vets as well.

The rest of the intake are all Australians apparently. failure rate among the Aussies is extremely low.

So the US Agent said I should have no problem at all fitting in with either group. The Aussies usually stick together and are clicky but he says you probably find a place in both groups.


As I’ve said, you are not going to get taxed twice, but the USA wants to know what your financial interest are, accounts numbers, amount in value, address where account is kept, privately or jointly held.

Good luck with your interviews.

I just got back from San Francisco which the captain of Swiss thought it would be good idea to try and ride the strong Jetstream across North America and the Atlantic with 350km/hr tailwind to save about 45 minutes, but is was the bumpiest flight I have ever taken. It was never ending from about 3 hours after take off to about 2 hours before landing, almost 5 hours of heavy turbulence. They didn’t even serve coffee with breakfast as the flight attendants were strapped in their seats most of the time before breakfast, which was smooth flying by this time. I couldn’t eat anything after being what seemed like being in a “ tumble dryer” for 5 hours. Just needed coffee, but there wasn’t any. :D

I would have preferred if we arrived on scheduled time and flown the normal route over Greenland and Iceland, instead of across the open sea of the Atlantic.


I'm sure they do want to know everything.

The immigration process just after interviews is a fairly lengthy process and detailed but the airline knows how to pull strings in Government to move things along quicker. It happens all pretty quickly but can take up to 2 months, and includes finger printing, criminal checks, and a face to face interview with one of their consulates.

Australia and US have very strong bilateral agreements and a headed towards full Customs Union and already have Free Trade. And I have noticed a lot of Americans coming to Australia as well as permanent residents so they got this 2 way thing going on now. Lots of Australians going to America as well, especially young Aussies and students going over there to study and work for a while. General consensus among our young people is that places like New York and LA and also Chicago is where it's all happening and they find the place exciting and interesting. Family friends of ours just moved to Washington. They were on the actual front lawns of The White House when Trump was hosting Australian PM for the day so they were on the lawns with Trump on the Rotunda with Australia's PM and they witnessed all the fanfare. The US Government had the White House lawns open to any Australian Citizens so the lawns were full of Australians living in Washington. I was amazed they did that actually considering all the security aspects of this day and age.

I do know Americans have a bit of a love affair with Australia at the moment.

Yes well we love the Jetstreams as long as its on our tail. So you go as high as possible where the wind is the strongest, pull the thrust levers all the way back to conserve fuel and let the wind work for you. Saves a lot of fuel and what that means for the business is thousands in savings so commercially it's what airlines want within reason of course because it can also be turbulent and uncomfortable for passengers. Unless it gets too bad, we will always ride the jetsream. The anti thesis to that is if the Jetsream is against us then a lower altitude is necessary, you push the power levers forward and fuel consumption is through the roof because of the higher power setting and lower altitude.
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Re: All roads eventually lead to Cyprus...

Postby Kikapu » Tue Feb 11, 2020 4:18 am

Paphitis wrote:
Kikapu wrote:
Paphitis wrote:Thanks Kikapu.

I certainly won't be risking any criminal conviction so will comply with all US Laws - including tax declaration obligations.

What is unclear though is how they tax individuals like myself as I don't have any flush personal accounts in Australia.

I do have however, some business accounts, and also some loans. These are registered in Australia and hence tax is paid and levied on any profit at the company tax rate.

I doubt the US is able to tax these Australian Registered Companies. But I will definitely ask what my obligations are and whether I should declare them or if it only applies to personal accounts. Whatever the case may be, I will be following the letter of the law.

Process is starting to get real now. They have been in tough with me overnight via email, and want me to specify a time for the first interview.

The US Agent, has also been in contact this morning telling me they will be in touch shortly and tell me when the interview is so he can prepare me for it. So I sent him an email and awaiting his response.

Another interesting bit of information is that they have this Rotor Program where they are converting US Military Rotor Pilots to fix wing. They will be on course with us if we get there, but they start 3 months earlier at the Academy for their fix wing conversion. Failure rate is 25% for these guys as they got no fixed wing time, but they put in a lot of resources to get them through because most of them are vets as well.

The rest of the intake are all Australians apparently. failure rate among the Aussies is extremely low.

So the US Agent said I should have no problem at all fitting in with either group. The Aussies usually stick together and are clicky but he says you probably find a place in both groups.


As I’ve said, you are not going to get taxed twice, but the USA wants to know what your financial interest are, accounts numbers, amount in value, address where account is kept, privately or jointly held.

Good luck with your interviews.

I just got back from San Francisco which the captain of Swiss thought it would be good idea to try and ride the strong Jetstream across North America and the Atlantic with 350km/hr tailwind to save about 45 minutes, but is was the bumpiest flight I have ever taken. It was never ending from about 3 hours after take off to about 2 hours before landing, almost 5 hours of heavy turbulence. They didn’t even serve coffee with breakfast as the flight attendants were strapped in their seats most of the time before breakfast, which was smooth flying by this time. I couldn’t eat anything after being what seemed like being in a “ tumble dryer” for 5 hours. Just needed coffee, but there wasn’t any. :D

I would have preferred if we arrived on scheduled time and flown the normal route over Greenland and Iceland, instead of across the open sea of the Atlantic.


I'm sure they do want to know everything.

The immigration process just after interviews is a fairly lengthy process and detailed but the airline knows how to pull strings in Government to move things along quicker. It happens all pretty quickly but can take up to 2 months, and includes finger printing, criminal checks, and a face to face interview with one of their consulates.

Australia and US have very strong bilateral agreements and a headed towards full Customs Union and already have Free Trade. And I have noticed a lot of Americans coming to Australia as well as permanent residents so they got this 2 way thing going on now.

I do know Americans have a bit of a love affair with Australia at the moment.

Yes well we love the Jetstreams as long as its on our tail. So you go as high as possible where the wind is the strongest, pull the thrust levers all the way back to conserve fuel and let the wind work for you. Saves a lot of fuel and what that means for the business is thousands in savings so commercially it's what airlines want within reason of course because it can also be turbulent and uncomfortable for passengers. Unless it gets too bad, we will always ride the jetsream. The anti thesis to that is if the Jetsream is against us then a lower altitude is necessary, you push the power levers forward and fuel consumption is through the roof because of the higher power setting and lower altitude.


Monitoring the flight channel , we were doing 1260 km/hr. I needed my coffee! :D
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Re: All roads eventually lead to Cyprus...

Postby Paphitis » Tue Feb 11, 2020 4:41 am

Kikapu wrote:
Paphitis wrote:
Kikapu wrote:
Paphitis wrote:Thanks Kikapu.

I certainly won't be risking any criminal conviction so will comply with all US Laws - including tax declaration obligations.

What is unclear though is how they tax individuals like myself as I don't have any flush personal accounts in Australia.

I do have however, some business accounts, and also some loans. These are registered in Australia and hence tax is paid and levied on any profit at the company tax rate.

I doubt the US is able to tax these Australian Registered Companies. But I will definitely ask what my obligations are and whether I should declare them or if it only applies to personal accounts. Whatever the case may be, I will be following the letter of the law.

Process is starting to get real now. They have been in tough with me overnight via email, and want me to specify a time for the first interview.

The US Agent, has also been in contact this morning telling me they will be in touch shortly and tell me when the interview is so he can prepare me for it. So I sent him an email and awaiting his response.

Another interesting bit of information is that they have this Rotor Program where they are converting US Military Rotor Pilots to fix wing. They will be on course with us if we get there, but they start 3 months earlier at the Academy for their fix wing conversion. Failure rate is 25% for these guys as they got no fixed wing time, but they put in a lot of resources to get them through because most of them are vets as well.

The rest of the intake are all Australians apparently. failure rate among the Aussies is extremely low.

So the US Agent said I should have no problem at all fitting in with either group. The Aussies usually stick together and are clicky but he says you probably find a place in both groups.


As I’ve said, you are not going to get taxed twice, but the USA wants to know what your financial interest are, accounts numbers, amount in value, address where account is kept, privately or jointly held.

Good luck with your interviews.

I just got back from San Francisco which the captain of Swiss thought it would be good idea to try and ride the strong Jetstream across North America and the Atlantic with 350km/hr tailwind to save about 45 minutes, but is was the bumpiest flight I have ever taken. It was never ending from about 3 hours after take off to about 2 hours before landing, almost 5 hours of heavy turbulence. They didn’t even serve coffee with breakfast as the flight attendants were strapped in their seats most of the time before breakfast, which was smooth flying by this time. I couldn’t eat anything after being what seemed like being in a “ tumble dryer” for 5 hours. Just needed coffee, but there wasn’t any. :D

I would have preferred if we arrived on scheduled time and flown the normal route over Greenland and Iceland, instead of across the open sea of the Atlantic.


I'm sure they do want to know everything.

The immigration process just after interviews is a fairly lengthy process and detailed but the airline knows how to pull strings in Government to move things along quicker. It happens all pretty quickly but can take up to 2 months, and includes finger printing, criminal checks, and a face to face interview with one of their consulates.

Australia and US have very strong bilateral agreements and a headed towards full Customs Union and already have Free Trade. And I have noticed a lot of Americans coming to Australia as well as permanent residents so they got this 2 way thing going on now.

I do know Americans have a bit of a love affair with Australia at the moment.

Yes well we love the Jetstreams as long as its on our tail. So you go as high as possible where the wind is the strongest, pull the thrust levers all the way back to conserve fuel and let the wind work for you. Saves a lot of fuel and what that means for the business is thousands in savings so commercially it's what airlines want within reason of course because it can also be turbulent and uncomfortable for passengers. Unless it gets too bad, we will always ride the jetsream. The anti thesis to that is if the Jetsream is against us then a lower altitude is necessary, you push the power levers forward and fuel consumption is through the roof because of the higher power setting and lower altitude.


Monitoring the flight channel , we were doing 1260 km/hr. I needed my coffee! :D


There was a North American transatlantic flight that broke over 800 knots last week. They would have broken all kinds of records.

Just think, 2 to 3 hours ahead of schedule. :D

Pilots are probably thinking the quicker they get there, the quicker they can have a beer. :)
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Re: All roads eventually lead to Cyprus...

Postby Cap » Tue Feb 11, 2020 7:06 pm

Republic of Cyprus continuing to bring joy to foreign workers and students who have never experienced snow.


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Re: All roads eventually lead to Cyprus...

Postby Kikapu » Wed Feb 12, 2020 12:15 am

Paphitis wrote:
Yes well we love the Jetstreams as long as its on our tail. So you go as high as possible where the wind is the strongest, pull the thrust levers all the way back to conserve fuel and let the wind work for you..


But you can’t pull all the thrust leavers all the way back when at your cruising altitude in a Jetstream, or else you will stall and fall to the ground. The whole purpose of the Jetstream is to add more speed to the ones the engines are producing to arrive to your destination sooner than planned, which the extra ground speed produced by the Jetstream will cause the aircraft to use less fuel. Is this not correct?
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Re: All roads eventually lead to Cyprus...

Postby Paphitis » Tue Feb 18, 2020 2:09 am

Kikapu wrote:
Paphitis wrote:
Yes well we love the Jetstreams as long as its on our tail. So you go as high as possible where the wind is the strongest, pull the thrust levers all the way back to conserve fuel and let the wind work for you..


But you can’t pull all the thrust leavers all the way back when at your cruising altitude in a Jetstream, or else you will stall and fall to the ground. The whole purpose of the Jetstream is to add more speed to the ones the engines are producing to arrive to your destination sooner than planned, which the extra ground speed produced by the Jetstream will cause the aircraft to use less fuel. Is this not correct?


Yes you can pull right back to about 40% which is probably a sensible power setting. We are usually at 40% on descent because we try and Descend at 250KIAS until passing 10000Ft where will start to slow down. Keep in mind, 250KIAS is 350 knots at 20000FT

When we hold in a pattern, we do pull back to 25% which is just enough to maintain altitude at a sensible speed of about 140knots IAS. That's our minimum as Vref is normally about 120 knots which gives a buffer of 1.3 on your stall speed. But the aircraft is very sloppy and unresponsive at those speeds. But we save a LOT of fuel. You don't want to be burning dollars if you can avoid it.

I never go as low as 140KIAS personally, but I know guys who do. It is our FCOM minimum. 160KIAS in cloud or icing conditions. I go as low as 160KIAS in the holding pattern or when speed restricted. If I don't make my cross over waypoint delay time for the flow, I tell Control I'm at minimums and they give me a vector to assist with the flow. I prefer doing it that way, but the disadvantage of doing it my way is that I will burn a lot more fuel.

I also carry more fuel than others do. I add for the wife and kids.

BTW, I just had my HR and Tech interview today with United. I was really impressed with these guys. Absolute professionals. I was lucky that the Tech Interview was done by an Afghan Vet who started off saying he worked very closely with Australians in Afghanistan and said "you Aussies are an absolute hoot when you want to be a total professionals when you need to be" Then we started talking about all our experiences for 20 minutes. It was really good.

The whole process was almost totally informal. I felt so comfortable with this guy and the HR lady. We were like 2 guys chilling at the bar having a casual conversation before we got to the actual interview. I liked the HR lady as well. She was very lovely.

Oh, I had to brief a LIDO chart made by Lufthansa. Never operated with LIDO before. It has to be the only US company that uses LIDO. Everyone else uses Jeppessen which is a Boeing company and as far as I am concerned, they are the best. But they told me consideration will be given because of my unfamiliarity with the LIDO system. That could have been a bit more polished but i got there in the end. they guy said he could tell I prepared well for the interview.

The other peculiarity is that the Yanks are not metric so all METARs and TAFs are in Statute Miles visibility as well as the descend minimas and Runway Visual Range and Altimeter Settings are in inches of mercury rather than millibars. So you fly in the states using imperial, and as soon as you cross over to Canada it's all metric. :lol:

One o fmy contacts told my one of the Aussies couldn't decipher the altimeter setting.

I made sure I was prepared for all that. But they knew I would be metric and probably would have forgiven any mistakes.

Overall, it was all very painless. My contacts said they have already decided on recruiting me even before the interview. And surely enough, even before I was interviewed they had issued me with a condition letter of offer, 3 days before the interview.
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Re: All roads eventually lead to Cyprus...

Postby Kikapu » Tue Feb 18, 2020 2:59 am

Paphitis wrote:
Kikapu wrote:
Paphitis wrote:
Yes well we love the Jetstreams as long as its on our tail. So you go as high as possible where the wind is the strongest, pull the thrust levers all the way back to conserve fuel and let the wind work for you..


But you can’t pull all the thrust leavers all the way back when at your cruising altitude in a Jetstream, or else you will stall and fall to the ground. The whole purpose of the Jetstream is to add more speed to the ones the engines are producing to arrive to your destination sooner than planned, which the extra ground speed produced by the Jetstream will cause the aircraft to use less fuel. Is this not correct?


Yes you can pull right back to about 40% which is probably a sensible power setting. We are usually at 40% on descent because we try and Descend at 250KIAS until passing 10000Ft where will start to slow down. Keep in mind, 250KIAS is 350 knots at 20000FT

When we hold in a pattern, we do pull back to 25% which is just enough to maintain altitude at a sensible speed of about 140knots IAS. That's our minimum as Vref is normally about 120 knots which gives a buffer of 1.3 on your stall speed. But the aircraft is very sloppy and unresponsive at those speeds. But we save a LOT of fuel. You don't want to be burning dollars if you can avoid it.

I never go as low as 140KIAS personally, but I know guys who do. It is our FCOM minimum. 160KIAS in cloud or icing conditions. I go as low as 160KIAS in the holding pattern or when speed restricted. If I don't make my cross over waypoint delay time for the flow, I tell Control I'm at minimums and they give me a vector to assist with the flow. I prefer doing it that way, but the disadvantage of doing it my way is that I will burn a lot more fuel.

I also carry more fuel than others do. I add for the wife and kids.

BTW, I just had my HR and Tech interview today with United. I was really impressed with these guys. Absolute professionals. I was lucky that the Tech Interview was done by an Afghan Vet who started of saying he worked very closely with Australians in Afghanistan and said "you Aussies are an absolute hoot when you want to be a total professionals when you need to be" Then we started talking about all our experiences for 20 minutes. It was really good.

The whole process was almost totally informal. I felt so comfortable with this guy and the HR lady. We were like to guys chilling at the bar having a casual conversation before we got to the actual interview.


When I flew back last week from San Francisco to Zurich, we were cruising at 10,000 meters/33,000ft most of the time in the Jetstream. Can you maintain that altitude if you trottle back 40%? At later stage, we were at 12,000 meters/39,000ft as the aircraft got a little lighter with burnt fuel. The whole idea of taking advantage of the Jetstream is to maintain normal trottle setting for the altitude and speed plus the free ride from the tail wind to increase the ground speed to arrive at destination sooner, hence saving fuel and money for the company.

Good luck with your interviews. Sounds like you will be flying stateside soon.
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Re: All roads eventually lead to Cyprus...

Postby Paphitis » Tue Feb 18, 2020 3:55 am

Kikapu wrote:
Paphitis wrote:
Kikapu wrote:
Paphitis wrote:
Yes well we love the Jetstreams as long as its on our tail. So you go as high as possible where the wind is the strongest, pull the thrust levers all the way back to conserve fuel and let the wind work for you..


But you can’t pull all the thrust leavers all the way back when at your cruising altitude in a Jetstream, or else you will stall and fall to the ground. The whole purpose of the Jetstream is to add more speed to the ones the engines are producing to arrive to your destination sooner than planned, which the extra ground speed produced by the Jetstream will cause the aircraft to use less fuel. Is this not correct?


Yes you can pull right back to about 40% which is probably a sensible power setting. We are usually at 40% on descent because we try and Descend at 250KIAS until passing 10000Ft where will start to slow down. Keep in mind, 250KIAS is 350 knots at 20000FT

When we hold in a pattern, we do pull back to 25% which is just enough to maintain altitude at a sensible speed of about 140knots IAS. That's our minimum as Vref is normally about 120 knots which gives a buffer of 1.3 on your stall speed. But the aircraft is very sloppy and unresponsive at those speeds. But we save a LOT of fuel. You don't want to be burning dollars if you can avoid it.

I never go as low as 140KIAS personally, but I know guys who do. It is our FCOM minimum. 160KIAS in cloud or icing conditions. I go as low as 160KIAS in the holding pattern or when speed restricted. If I don't make my cross over waypoint delay time for the flow, I tell Control I'm at minimums and they give me a vector to assist with the flow. I prefer doing it that way, but the disadvantage of doing it my way is that I will burn a lot more fuel.

I also carry more fuel than others do. I add for the wife and kids.

BTW, I just had my HR and Tech interview today with United. I was really impressed with these guys. Absolute professionals. I was lucky that the Tech Interview was done by an Afghan Vet who started of saying he worked very closely with Australians in Afghanistan and said "you Aussies are an absolute hoot when you want to be a total professionals when you need to be" Then we started talking about all our experiences for 20 minutes. It was really good.

The whole process was almost totally informal. I felt so comfortable with this guy and the HR lady. We were like to guys chilling at the bar having a casual conversation before we got to the actual interview.


When I flew back last week from San Francisco to Zurich, we were cruising at 10,000 meters/33,000ft most of the time in the Jetstream. Can you maintain that altitude if you trottle back 40%? At later stage, we were at 12,000 meters/39,000ft as the aircraft got a little lighter with burnt fuel. The whole idea of taking advantage of the Jetstream is to maintain normal trottle setting for the altitude and speed plus the free ride from the tail wind to increase the ground speed to arrive at destination sooner, hence saving fuel and money for the company.

Good luck with your interviews. Sounds like you will be flying stateside soon.


Yes you can. I think most heavy aircraft like B737, 777, 787, A350, A380, A330 can as well but the performance will differ from type to type and the heavier the aircraft the higher the stall speed when clean (no flaps).

We can go as low as 25% below 10000FT but I don't like the handling characteristics and slow speeds make me nervous these days. In my old days, I would be doing laps low level between 100FT to 2000FT with all the flaps hanging out. All Engines Operating of course but enroute we would completely shut down an engine to conserve fuel. You can't do that legally in the civil industry of course but we would virtually do what we liked for operational reasons.
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