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Private Healthcare in UK

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Re: Private Healthcare in UK

Postby Londonrake » Mon Sep 18, 2023 7:34 pm

Lordo wrote:As to my Swine friends, just to let you know that I will no longer read your shit.


You're making a mistake there. You should cherish the very few in here who actually respond to your stuff. Although, I suspect you would much rather be left alone to broadcast your particularly distorted views without interruption. On this "discussion" forum.

Looking at the filth you routinely churn out, neither CG's nor my posts on this thread were particularly personally offensive. And both contained glimpses of the "real world" regarding the NHS.

But - hey-ho. There's nothing new in the.................... So, if you want to throw your dummy in the dirt you can go over there in the petulant, pouter's corner.

That doesn't of course stop me or anyone else from having their say. Although, this particular thread has reached the optimum Lordo boredom level for now I think. :wink:
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Re: Private Healthcare in UK

Postby Lordo » Tue Sep 19, 2023 12:07 pm

Just another parasite living off the NHS. Ohps did I say parasite? I meant Private Health Care.

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2018/aug/05/virgin-awarded-almost-2bn-of-nhs-contracts-in-the-past-five-years
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Re: Private Healthcare in UK

Postby Lordo » Tue Sep 19, 2023 12:12 pm

This makes very interesting reading.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-34660486

A recent report by the think-tank, the Centre for Health and Public Interest, estimates that around 6,000 patients a year are admitted to the NHS from private hospitals. Around 2,500 of these transfers are emergencies.

One of the authors of the report, Prof Colin Leys, says most private hospitals are smaller than their NHS counterparts and do not have intensive care beds to treat patients when complications arise. He says staffing levels also differ:

"Typically private hospitals will only have one doctor on site to take care of all post-operative patients. In an NHS hospital there are specialist teams available in every speciality."

He also highlights concerns about the availability of safety and performance data relating to the private sector.

"The system for reporting serious incidents in the private sector is different and is a much less transparent model than in the NHS."


How wrong one can be.

"My mother had been there some years previously for an operation and had a very positive experience. We thought the standard of care would be probably better than the NHS. We felt because it was a private clinic it would be probably a nicer environment. Why not benefit from a little bit more comfort and luxury?"

The operation was carried out as planned and his son says the family was told that "it couldn't have gone better."

However James suffered from post-operative urine retention and was kept in overnight. While staff were encouraging him to drink fluids he wasn't passing water and 14 hours passed before a catheter was inserted.

Richard says things began to deteriorate: "About five o'clock in the morning my father was found in the corridor in a state of undress, clearly confused."

Shortly after, he suffered a series of seizures and was transferred to Bradford Royal Infirmary where he died from multi-organ failure due to brain injury from water intoxication and sepsis from pneumonia.

At the inquest the coroner said the management of his fluid intake was "haphazard at the very least" and the overloading of fluid "went unnoticed and unmonitored".

Richard believes his father's case raises a serious issue. "There's a big question mark over the hospital's ability to deal with the crisis. Do they have the back up to deal with this type of emergency?
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Re: Private Healthcare in UK

Postby Lordo » Tue Sep 19, 2023 6:42 pm

What do you know, never enough, they must grab more.

Whilst understaffed wards and surgeries turn to well-connected private sector agencies to fill the gaps created by Cameron's health 'reforms', the NHS's own in-house recruitment agency is to be sold off, it has emerged.

Last week it emerged that Jeremy Hunt plans to sell off the National Health Service in-house recruitment agency, NHS Professionals, before the election. The agency was established in 2000 to reduce the amount spent on recruitment fees. It has 40,000 workers on its books, providing bank nurses to 65 NHS trusts.


https://www.opendemocracy.net/en/ournhs/tory-links-of-health-agencies-exposed-as-hunt-lines-up-next-nhs-selloff-in-england/
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Re: Private Healthcare in UK

Postby Lordo » Tue Sep 19, 2023 6:52 pm

Here is another angle to how Private Medical Organisation affect the NHS.

There has always been a state of competition between the NHS and the private healthcare industry, but that competition does not take place on a level playing field.

The great majority of clinical staff that work in private healthcare have been trained by the NHS, largely at the expense of the taxpayer.

Private health providers do not carry the direct or indirect costs of this training. NHS hospitals have the responsibility to provide comprehensive 24/7 services, not only in A&E, but in most other medical and surgical specialties, whereas private healthcare providers can steer clear of such commitments.

The way in which VAT is applied to many drugs, devices and equipment is less favourable to NHS hospitals than to private hospitals.

All of these factors allow private health providers to undercut NHS providers when bidding for contracts to treat NHS patients. In many specialties, the income from a steady flow of predictable elective and outpatient work heavily subsidises the cost of providing round-the-clock emergency care. If elective care is contracted out to private providers, there is a strong possibility that your local hospital will be unable to continue to provide the level of urgent care that patients previously enjoyed. It also has an impact on training. Surgeons in training require exposure to the learning that comes from operating, under appropriate supervision, on patients in the controlled setting of “routine” operating sessions: if this work moves to the private sector, it can take much longer to build up the expertise and confidence of the next generation of surgeons.

As waiting times have risen and inflexible conditions have been introduced as to what can and cannot be treated within the NHS, it is not surprising that the demand for private health insurance and self-paid treatment has risen inexorably since 2013, reflecting a lack of confidence that the NHS can provide a comprehensive and responsive service.

Many of our parliamentarians, in every major party, have financial links to the private healthcare industry; the revolving doors between the civil service and commerce are spinning rapidly; and many senior doctors are also able to spot commercial opportunities. Unfortunately, this approach seriously undermines social cohesion in our divided country.
Dr Colin Hutchinson
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Re: Private Healthcare in UK

Postby Lordo » Tue Sep 19, 2023 7:02 pm

Not that different to the way private train operators work. They are not interested serving the public, they are only interested in the most profitable lines. Medical treatment is no different.
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Re: Private Healthcare in UK

Postby Lordo » Tue Sep 19, 2023 7:08 pm

Yet another way the Private Health is causing the NHS waiting lists to grow.

Yet the Swine insists the reason why the waiting lists are growing is because of the strikes. The fact that the list were huge before the strikes and were growing then does not seems to come to their notice. Add to that there has been 180 days since the Health minister sat down and talked to BMA. There is only one way to deal with this. Just having a few days here and there will not work. They have to come out and stay out. And then lets see what the Swine are made of.

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2022/jan/21/incentives-used-to-entice-nhs-consultants-to-do-private-work-must-be-disclosed
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Re: Private Healthcare in UK

Postby Lordo » Wed Sep 20, 2023 12:21 pm

If you are wondering why the Swine are refusing to negotiate with the Doctors, wonder no more. The Swine like the idea of Doctors going on strike. It gives them an opportunity to bring in cover from private agencies at a huge cost. You cannot make it up. And then the Swine hear claim the NHS budget is too high. It would be interesting to be able to work out how much of the NHS budget in a year actually ends up in private hands.

During the first three junior doctor's strikes, University Hospitals Plymouth paid nearly £1.8m for cover - £1.59m to consultants - while less than £430,000 was saved in wage deductions.

And it is a similar story in other trusts that responded to a BBC News Freedom of Information request.

During the first four walkouts, Hull University Hospitals NHS Trust, where three-quarters of junior doctors have been joining picket lines, paid nearly £1.7m to consultants and other senior doctors providing cover - three times the amount saved.


https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-66861960
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Re: Private Healthcare in UK

Postby Lordo » Wed Sep 20, 2023 12:26 pm

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Re: Private Healthcare in UK

Postby Lordo » Tue Sep 26, 2023 8:06 pm

https://blogs.lse.ac.uk/politicsandpolicy/nhs-spending-on-the-independent-sector/#:~:text=The%207%25%20figure,to%20purchase%20healthcare%20for%20patients.

26% Wow and of course this was before the pandemic.

The presentation of data on NHS expenditure is flawed, writes David Rowland, which prevents policymakers from having a clear understanding of where money within the system is going. He estimates that in 2018/19, the amount spent by NHS England on the independent sector was around 26% of total expenditure, not 7% as widely reported.
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