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The risks to children of British public schools.

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Re: The risks to children of British public schools.

Postby Londonrake » Mon Nov 11, 2019 5:28 pm

Pyrpolizer wrote:
Londonrake wrote:
Pyrpolizer wrote:
miltiades wrote:Did you say " children of a pilot" ????????????????????


Well, what difference does it make either he is, or he is not.
Most pilots I know have similar mentality to Paphitis.

Regardless he is my major "partner" in discussions,
he writes tons of stuff, if anything he’s challenging and thought provoking,
and I filtered some noble traits in his personality.

The truth however is that I never agreed with him on ANYTHING! :shock:


That’s a very magnanimous and frank post. Any left for me? :D :wink:


But what do I know about you from this forum? Almost nothing ...
Not your fault actually, as it seems I am the one who is not following the forum regularly.


No I pop in and out too (as the Bishop said to the Actress). Mostly because I don’t want Lordo to feel neglected. :wink:
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Re: The risks to children of British public schools.

Postby Lordo » Mon Nov 11, 2019 5:41 pm

bafidi a pilot last week he culd not ride a bike.
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Re: The risks to children of British public schools.

Postby Pyrpolizer » Mon Nov 11, 2019 6:20 pm

Paphitis wrote:Now you are assuming these kids are suffering from anxiety and anger issues to have maladaptive behavioral issues. This isn't the case at all. These kids are probably the least likely to have anxiety or anger issues. Not impossible for them to have these types of issues of course, but it isn't more prevalent in kids who are living a life of privilege than another child that is with their parents and are struggling to survive. These kids are attending a fine school.


I am not assuming. I am relying on scientific evidence by experts.
You 've been provided with links which you failed to read, and you go on repeating the same nonsense over and over again.
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Re: The risks to children of British public schools.

Postby Paphitis » Tue Nov 12, 2019 12:48 am

Lordo wrote:bafidi a pilot last week he culd not ride a bike.


Last week I rode a BMW GSA 1250cc from Canberra to Sydney.

It wasn't mine. It was our companies Head of Training and Checking. 8)

That was a lot of fun. Thoroughly enjoyable.
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Re: The risks to children of British public schools.

Postby Paphitis » Tue Nov 12, 2019 12:54 am

Pyrpolizer wrote:
Paphitis wrote:Now you are assuming these kids are suffering from anxiety and anger issues to have maladaptive behavioral issues. This isn't the case at all. These kids are probably the least likely to have anxiety or anger issues. Not impossible for them to have these types of issues of course, but it isn't more prevalent in kids who are living a life of privilege than another child that is with their parents and are struggling to survive. These kids are attending a fine school.


I am not assuming. I am relying on scientific evidence by experts.
You 've been provided with links which you failed to read, and you go on repeating the same nonsense over and over again.


What scientific information from experts? I am getting rather sick of hearing about these experts who probably just want to cut the system down. Do you know how good these schools are? People actually travel from overseas to attend them as International Students. Usually these are from wealthy families. We are talking about children of Hiawei CEOs from China and all sorts.

Did they come to look at the children at Geelong, Prince Alfred and such like?

Do they actually understand what they are talking about? Do they understand the fact that for many, these schools are the only way for some kids to actually attend a school and interact with teachers and other children?

Some people have 2 option:

1) either gho yo boarding school, or
2) Australia's Remote School of the Air - which is actually quite innovative but no comparison at all for actually attending a real school by boarding.

Living in the outback on a huge station isn't exactly an easy life for a child. Being in the school grounds of Geelong, or Wilderness, or Prince Alfred would be like being in Disney land for them.
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Re: The risks to children of British public schools.

Postby erolz66 » Tue Nov 12, 2019 11:24 am

I want to go off at a tangent and talk about this "Cypriot" thing for a bit. It is integral to my story, my personal story.

For my father the question of where to send his sons was simple. "Get them the best. Get them the most expensive."

For my father, my Cypriot father, there was a very real "physical" sense in which more expensive equated with better. For my father part of the point of having made it financially was to be able to display that success to others. This was true across the board for my father. In choice of house, choice of car. As a Cypriot village boy born in to sleepy Cypriot village existence in the 1930s who had gone to London to seek his fortune and "made it" an integral part of the enjoyment of such, the point of such, was to display it externally. Something, anything, that is more expensive is better at meeting this need than something less expensive. As far as I am concerned large elements of this reality for my father were deeply and inherently cultural. Culturally Cypriot. Inherently 'village culture'. My non Cypriot mother did not and does not have this same level of better being defined in absolute terms by price alone. Nor is their any value or interest for her in how effectively something displays wealth, displays success, or not. It is in my story a culturally Cypriot thing. A thing for me off my father.

In addition the 'nepotism' aspects of the British public school system, the priority given based on family and the like, these are in my view, aspects that resonated strongly with the kind of village Cypriot outlook my father had. The dynastic aspects of the public school selection system, the importance and priority of "who your people are" above just "what are the childs abilities", these are things that speak strongly to old school Cypriot identity that my father had. Privileged is supposed to follow family lines regardless of individual ability. That is built in to the public school selection system and I would claim also built in to the Cypriot identity to varying degrees.
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Re: The risks to children of British public schools.

Postby erolz66 » Tue Nov 12, 2019 11:33 am

Paphitis wrote:Some people have 2 option:

1) either gho yo boarding school, or
2) Australia's Remote School of the Air - which is actually quite innovative but no comparison at all for actually attending a real school by boarding.


There are other options. https://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-11-18/ ... ds/8038306

Paphitis wrote:Living in the outback on a huge station isn't exactly an easy life for a child. Being in the school grounds of Geelong, or Wilderness, or Prince Alfred would be like being in Disney land for them.


If the primary purpose of boarding schools in australia was to provide environments for children that predominately come from backgrounds that would be worse without the boarding option, like children already in care to give one example, but children from remote areas would be another, they would not be schools that are so attractive to you. If 70% or more of boarders at Geelong were from an average sample of all such remote children, both rich and white through to poor and aboriginal and all in between, they would not be schools that you would want your child at. If 70% of all boarders where children already previously in care this would be even more true.
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Re: The risks to children of British public schools.

Postby Pyrpolizer » Tue Nov 12, 2019 4:05 pm

erolz66 wrote:I want to go off at a tangent and talk about this "Cypriot" thing for a bit. It is integral to my story, my personal story.

For my father the question of where to send his sons was simple. "Get them the best. Get them the most expensive."

For my father, my Cypriot father, there was a very real "physical" sense in which more expensive equated with better. For my father part of the point of having made it financially was to be able to display that success to others. This was true across the board for my father. In choice of house, choice of car. As a Cypriot village boy born in to sleepy Cypriot village existence in the 1930s who had gone to London to seek his fortune and "made it" an integral part of the enjoyment of such, the point of such, was to display it externally. Something, anything, that is more expensive is better at meeting this need than something less expensive. As far as I am concerned large elements of this reality for my father were deeply and inherently cultural. Culturally Cypriot. Inherently 'village culture'. My non Cypriot mother did not and does not have this same level of better being defined in absolute terms by price alone. Nor is their any value or interest for her in how effectively something displays wealth, displays success, or not. It is in my story a culturally Cypriot thing. A thing for me off my father.

In addition the 'nepotism' aspects of the British public school system, the priority given based on family and the like, these are in my view, aspects that resonated strongly with the kind of village Cypriot outlook my father had. The dynastic aspects of the public school selection system, the importance and priority of "who your people are" above just "what are the childs abilities", these are things that speak strongly to old school Cypriot identity that my father had. Privileged is supposed to follow family lines regardless of individual ability. That is built in to the public school selection system and I would claim also built in to the Cypriot identity to varying degrees.


Very true! And this peasant Cypriot culture extends for at least one more generation among of our expats.
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Re: The risks to children of British public schools.

Postby B25 » Thu Nov 14, 2019 5:45 pm

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Re: The risks to children of British public schools.

Postby erolz66 » Mon Nov 18, 2019 11:37 am

Anyway to get back on topic.

The risk to a child of sexual abuse is higher in classic British public school style schools than state ones is clear and plain from the actual evidence.

This is not about 'selection' which is an issue in its own right that crosses public / private divide. As shown by the state Perth Modern school having the 2nd highest 'elitist' admission policy in Australia.

This is about the structural brutality that is embedded into classic British public school system. It is not just about boarding, though that is a part of it. It is about subjecting our children to 1800 and 1900 notions on education unnecessarily and the unnecessary damage that does. We do not need to do this to our children any more. It is time for real change.
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